Search Results: "Ursula K. Le Guin"


BOOK REVIEW

FOUR WAYS TO FORGIVENESS by Ursula K. Le Guin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Whether constructing a moving and expressive love story, or articulating the feminist subtext, there is no more elegant or discerning expositor than Le Guin."
Four connected long stories from Le Guin (A Fisherman of the Inland Sea, 1994, etc.) featuring the planets Yeowe and Werel, the latter a slave-owning oligarchy, the former its colony. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FISHERMAN OF THE INLAND SEA by Ursula K. Le Guin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Limpid, affecting, inimitable, brilliant."
This new collection of science fiction from Le Guin (Searoad, 1991, etc.) is comprised of eight tales, written between 1983 and 1994, drawn from various magazines and anthologies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEERING THE CRAFT by Ursula K. Le Guin
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A succinct, clear, and encouraging companion for aspiring writers."
Practical writing advice from an acclaimed storyteller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 24, 1979

"Just how much better Wood might have done can be surmised from Jeff Levin's invaluable Le Guin bibliography, reprinted here as an appendix."
If you want evidence that people are thinking and writing about science fiction these days with sophistication and good sense, you need go no further than this volume. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TELLING by Ursula K. Le Guin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The usual mesmerizing Le Guin narrative and intensity of concept, but too one-sided to provoke resonance or plumb the depths."
Le Guin's latest (Unlocking the Air, 1996, etc.) belongs to her Hainish cycle—Hain being the planet that originally seeded Earth, and many other worlds, with the human species; now the Hainish are revisiting lost worlds and drawing them into the benevolent Ekumene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORD FOR WORLD IS FOREST by Ursula K. Le Guin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 12, 1976

"Lesser Le Guin, but often impressive."
Terran logging interests vs. the gentle natives of Athshe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FARTHEST SHORE by Ursula K. Le Guin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 8, 1972

"Further, although each of the two previous volumes was complete in itself there is an organic relationship among the three that cannot be realized without Ged's final, mighty 'Be thou made whole' and his drawing of the Rune of Ending."
In the third of the Earthsea volumes Sparrowhawk-Ged, now archmage at Roke, undertakes a long sea odyssey in search of the vague evil that is drying up true magic throughout the islands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRE AND STONE by Ursula K. Le Guin
Released: March 13, 1989

"Le Guin deftly brings out the humor in her ironical story; Marshall, with a remarkably sure hand for a first book, uses authoritative line and perspective and rich, bright color to bring Le Guin's imaginary world to dramatic life."
Once upon a time there was a country that lived in fear of a dragon." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 13, 1988

"Her often brilliant fiction scores higher by setting aside the didacticism."
A very mixed bag indeed, comprising 36 talks and essays (1976-88) and 17 reviews (1977-86), ranging from travel pieces and literary discussions to feminism, commencement addresses, and social-consciousness-raisers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEAROAD by Ursula K. Le Guin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Another triumph."
Various private lives in an Oregon seaside village are pried open for inspection in this winning example of Le Guin's best writing—meditative, perceptive, and dead-on in its characterizations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CATWINGS RETURN by Ursula K. Le Guin
Released: March 1, 1989

"Again, the small format is unusually attractive and appealing, marred only by the printer's inexcusable use of letter spacing."
In a sequel to Catwings (p. 975/C-162), two of the four winged kittens—who now live happily in the country with children who love them too much to exploit them—return to the city to visit their mother, only to find that their birthplace—a slum—is in the midst of demolition, their dumpster home gone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1990

"A grand conclusion to a revered cycle."
The time is out of joint in Earthsea, but it will not be Ged—seeking a new raison d'etre while grieving his recently lost powers as Archmage and hiding from the animosity of minor wizards—who can set it right. Read full book review >