Search Results: "Valeria Docampo"


BOOK REVIEW

TIP-TAP POP by Sarah Lynn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"A successful title in addressing a child's perspective of aging and memory loss, it nicely complements Mem Fox and Julie Vivas's classic Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge. (Picture book. 5-10)"
The process of watching a loved one grow older with significant memory loss is full of unanswered questions—for adults as well as children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARLIGHT GREY by Liz Flanagan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A title for confident emerging readers interested in new princess and knight stories. (Early reader/folk tale. 6-8)"
This early-reader adaptation of a Russian story reads like a "Cinderella" tale but casts a third-born son as its protagonist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ADVENTURERS by Rachel Elliot
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Crossing the ocean like the Child and her friends, this mildly precious 2011 tale joins a plethora of similar journeys tempting younger readers to embark on imaginary flights. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Snow outside is no obstacle to world-spanning adventures inside for a child and her toys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANGEROUSLY EVER AFTER by Dashka Slater
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2012

"Given that feisty, dirt-or-danger-loving princesses are almost a subgenre of princess books, don't choose this one first. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A story about a princess who relishes danger, illustrated with incongruous glossiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE AT THE END OF LADYBUG LANE by Elise Primavera
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 13, 2012

"Pleasant and amusing, but not quite a hit. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Angelina wants a pet, any pet, but to her neat-freak parents, an animal in the house would be intolerable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PENELOPE CRUMB NEVER FORGETS by Shawn K. Stout
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 24, 2013

"Readers will root for and relate to this fresh-voiced young heroine who joins the likes of Ramona, Judy Moody and Clementine. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Penelope Crumb is back with the same spunk and quirky narration that won readers over in her eponymous debut (2012). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE LITTLE TAMALES by Eric A. Kimmel
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2009

"A flavorful addition to the folktale shelf that begs to be shared with a group. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The traditional "Three Little Pigs" gets a southwestern flavor in Kimmel's latest updated tale, a takeoff on his previous The Runaway Tortilla (2000), illustrated by Randy Cecil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PENELOPE CRUMB by Shawn K. Stout
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 2, 2012

"Fans of Clementine and Ramona will cheer as new friend Penelope finds what she is looking for. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Penelope Crumb's large nose links her to her mysterious grandfather, who, it turns out, is not Graveyard Dead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEORGE BALANCHINE’S <i>THE NUTCRACKER</i> by New York City Ballet
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"An appealing production overall and a helpful introduction for children preparing to see the ballet, but it's one that needs some real little girls as artist's models. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This introduction to the ballet closely follows the production of the New York City Ballet, as originated by George Balanchine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 2, 1993

"A contemporary Way of the Pilgrim, first published in Russia in 1989, that's also a profoundly moving look at the state of one brave Russian woman's soul."
A passionate, gorgeously written fictional account of an intellectual Russian woman's journey back to God and the Orthodox Christianity of her ancestors. ``Veronica,'' a widow in her mid-40s, journeys to the ancient monastery of Dzhvari in Georgia with her beloved son Mitya. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAY EQUALS NIGHT by Valeria Narbikova
Released: Dec. 18, 1998

"That's about it, in a first novel whose supposedly scandalous opening scene is so swaddled in crisscrossing literary allusions that it's impossible to be sure who's doing what, and with what, to whom."
A barrage of digressions and references to her country's classic authors (mainly Pushkin, but also Tolstoy, Bely, Tsvetaeva, et al.) add minimal—and much-needed—color and life to this otherwise wan tale of adultery and boredom among Moscow's contemporary Bohemians. Read full book review >