Search Results: "Valerie Gladstone"


BOOK REVIEW

A YOUNG DANCER by Valerie Gladstone
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2009

"Aspiring dancers will warm up to Iman and, one hopes, put on some music and start dancing on their own. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 8-14)"
"Dancing makes me feel free," says Iman Bright, a student at the Ailey School. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTES FROM THE INTERNET APOCALYPSE by Wayne Gladstone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 4, 2014

"An acid cultural satire that skewers what we would miss most about the online world."
Cracked.com contributor Gladstone offers up an outlandishly specific takedown of online culture via the popular apocalypse comedy genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWO SERPENTS RISE by Max Gladstone
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Worth a try, even if it's often more impressive than alluring."
Another highly unusual fantasy (Three Parts Dead, 2012) set in the same carefully constructed, Aztec-inspired world of gods, magic and sacrifice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN PLANET EARTH WAS NEW by James Gladstone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2017

"A dramatic demonstration of geologic time for thoughtful readers and listeners. (glossary, author's note, sources) (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
Over billions of years of history, Earth has undergone amazing changes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST BEST DAYS OF SUMMER by Valerie Hobbs
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2010

"Engaging and thoughtful, if a trifle overdetermined. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Lucy's last-week-of-August visits to her grandmother Luz, a potter, at the lake have long been a highlight of her summers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

This well-documented resource, designed to support the social-science curricula in elementary- and middle-school classrooms, offers clear instructions on how to make 54 hands-on activities that celebrate the beauty and diversity of the Latino culture in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHEEP by Valerie Hobbs
ADVENTURE
Released: April 10, 2006

"The attitude that carries Jack through adventure after adventure to nothing short of a fairy-tale ending—complete with sheep—will win readers over and keep them rooting for him all the way. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A Border collie, down on his luck, searches for his life's work: a few good sheep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"The characterizations are solid, and while the narrative seems to amble, all the elements converge in an ending that will leave readers thoughtful and shaken. (Fiction. 12+)"
In the late 1950s Bron Lewis sees her life as over when her family, nearly broke, moves from New Jersey to the sleepy California town of Ojala after her father's failed suicide attempt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ACCIDENTAL COUNTESS by Valerie Bowman
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"Bowman is one to watch."
A group of friends performs a complicated ruse to help Lady Cassandra Monroe woo her cousin's intended in this Regency romance that borrows liberally from The Importance of Being Earnest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEARCH PARTY by Valerie Trueblood
Released: July 16, 2013

"Trueblood (Mary or Burn, 2010, etc.) is a writer to follow."
An uneven collection that contains a few outstanding examples of the art of the short story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 25, 1993

"As usual, Anand stages history nicely, though her books seldom compel as fiction."
The second installment in Anand's Bridges Over Time series (launched last year with The Proud Villains), which does Medieval English history from the points of view of its lowliest—a passel of serfs in East Anglia, who, here especially, look at a person as though they ``wanted to rob you, or eat you.'' That's what can be seen in the eyes of Isabel of Northfield, wife of Alfred Plowman as the story commences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 24, 1992

"But she moves too quickly from one generation to the next, resulting in cartoony characters and a historical backdrop that flies by like a movie on fast forward."
Herein, the commencement of a series by the author of such historical divertissements as Crown of Roses and King of the Wood (both 1989). Read full book review >