Search Results: "Vivian Berger"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SPHINX AT DAWN by Madeleine L'Engle
Released: July 1, 1982

"He is, however, an ordinary boy who claims friendship with a unicorn—a touch that says more about L'Engle's scheme of things than Christ's."
"It is yours, my son," says the father, referring to the gold, the jeweled boxes of incense, and the oil in crystal bottles—which, says the father, three wise men left for the boy Jehoshua when Yos was a baby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PUDDING PROBLEM by Joe Berger
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 9, 2017

"Further reading for fans of Timmy Failure and Big Nate. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 7-11)"
Sam Lyttle has a little problem with the truth: even when he's telling it, it isn't totally true. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIDGET FIDGET AND THE MOST PERFECT PET!  by Joe Berger
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2009

"Familiar waters, sure, but it's the rare child who doesn't dream of having his or her very own Thunderhooves. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bridget Fidget desperately wants a pet unicorn to name Thunderhooves, so when a giant box arrives downstairs marked "Fragile" (or, as she imagines, "Here's your new pet!") she dives right in, spreading Styrofoam pellets ("snow") all over the house. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD NIGHT! GOOD NIGHT! by Carin Berger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Young readers will giggle over the bedtime jollity, while parents may recognize the familiar bedtime battle and see themselves in the mother rabbit whose love and patience prevail.(Picture book. 3-7)"
Three mischievous bunnies finally fall asleep in this playful look at the bedtime routine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 16, 1991

"An uncommonly useful book that should be a godsend to any family have a member afflicted with manic depression."
A harrowing account of manic depression, plus information about the disease, by Diane Berger, mother of a manic-depressive son, and Lisa Berger, her sister and a free-lance writer (Parade, Vogue, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BENTO'S SKETCHBOOK by John Berger
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 2011

"Berger's readers will see with fresh eyes."
A deceptively brief volume offers profound meditations on art, the creative process and so much more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 9, 1999

"Emerging readers will be delighted by this unpretentious, comic tale. (Fiction. 6-9)"
paper 0-440-41397-4 Porcine protagonists lend a new twist to an all-too-familiar fairy tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST BOY AND GIRL IN THE WORLD by Siobhan Vivian
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 26, 2016

"The almost-dystopian setting of post-flood Aberdeen makes a beautifully surreal setting, even if Keeley's journey can't quite carry the narrative. (Fiction. 13-16)"
When disaster strikes a working-class town, the class clown learns her coping mechanisms don't help anyone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GARDENS OF AWE AND FOLLY by Vivian Swift
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"A breezy, whimsical book that does its best to approximate the renewal one might feel upon visiting a garden."
A charming stroll through some public gardens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 30, 2012

"Readers will be happily lost in this lively, engrossing book about home and family."
Jack's debut collectionweaves together spirited vignettes recalling his boyhood in Trinidad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APPROACHING EYE LEVEL by Vivian Gornick
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 1996

"Her prose is sharp and her characterizations—of her friends, modern life, and of herself— ring true. (Author tour)"
In these essays, journalist and essayist Vivian Gornick (Fierce Attachments, 1987) bravely faces—and, even more remarkable, clearly renders—loneliness and the ongoing search for human connection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 2012

"The issue is seldom front and center in books for teens, but Vivian refuses to falsify or avoid the uncomfortable realities that looks alone confer status, and their power is greatest when obscured by the pretense that 'looks don't matter.' (Fiction. 12 & up)"
This riveting exploration of physical appearance and the status it confers opens a cultural conversation that's needed to happen for a long time. Read full book review >