Search Results: "Vladimir Vagin"


BOOK REVIEW

PETER AND THE WOLF by Vladimir  Vagin
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"The exciting illustrations give another context to a modern folktale than can co-exist with the symphony that first made it famous. (Picture book. 4-7)"
An adventurous boy disregards his grandfather's orders to remain behind the closed garden gate when a fierce wolf is spotted in the neighborhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ENORMOUS CARROT by Vladimir  Vagin
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

"The familiarity of plot and repetition of phrase will create eager anticipation in readers, while the large format, bright primary palette, and anthropomorphized animals will keep listeners involved from any spot in the room. (Picture book/folklore. 3-6)"
Turnips are out, carrots are in—at least in this adaptation of the classic Russian folktale and in Jan Peck's The Giant Carrot (1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CELIA AND THE SWEET, SWEET WATER by Katherine Paterson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 1998

"Paterson's storytelling makes this a cut above many happily-ever-after tales, and Vagin's use of line in his fine paintings matches the story's style and tone. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Paterson (Parzival, p. 60, etc.) presents an original story with the age-old feel of a classic as she conjures up a brave and good-hearted heroine, a curmugeonly canine companion, and an adventurous journey through—where else?—the deep, dark forest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KING'S EQUAL by Katherine Paterson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"A handsome book; an entertaining, thought-provoking story. (Fiction/Young reader. 7-10)"
On his deathbed, the wise old king decrees that his arrogant son will not inherit the crown until he marries "a woman who is your equal in beauty and intelligence and wealth." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLYING WITCH by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"A good-humored remake, featuring a kinder, gentler witch than the general run of Baba Yaga tales. (Picture book/folktale. 7-9)"
Yolen crafts an original, updated tale from characters and elements found in traditional ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COOKIE ANGEL by Bethany Roberts
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Vagin's illustrations are serviceable but unexceptional, and again the cookie angel is the only character that stands out in the art as well as in the text. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Toys (and one cookie) come alive on Christmas Eve in this rather long and rather misguided story that tries too hard to stir up some holiday magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIREBIRD by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2002

"The double set of illustrations is somewhat detrimental to the folk tale, but will serve well as an introduction to the ballet. (Folktale. 5-8)"
The Firebird is a character in several Russian folktales as well as the title character in the famous ballet choreographed by George Balanchine to music by Stravinsky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLOWER FAERIE by Frank Asch
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"Pretty to look at, with a somewhat nebulous but well-intentioned message about respect for nature: a sugarplum of a book. (Picture book. 6-10)"
An original tale about a fairy captured and displayed as a trophy by an armor-clad emperor, who refuses to release his prize even when all the flowers in the kingdom die and his people are threatened with famine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE COMES THE CAT! by Frank Asch
Released: March 1, 1989

A laudable venture: the American Asch and Russian Vagin collaborate on a bilingual picture book with virtually the entire text given in the title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAR BROTHER by Frank Asch
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Nicely contrived to point out that people who lead very different lives can still care about one another, and that family history can be intriguing. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The Russian-American team whose 1989 collaboration, Here Comes the Cat, was ``the first Soviet/American children's book'' elaborates the story of the town mouse and the country mouse, setting it within another story about two present-day mouse brothers fascinated by letters they find in the attic of their farmhouse. Read full book review >