Search Results: "Vladimir Kuzichkin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 1991

"Thought-provoking testimony from an erstwhile cold warrior who's not marching anymore."
A former KGB major's matter-of-fact reminiscences of service as an espionage agent in Iran. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"It is hard to imagine anyone being able to pull this very odd offering off—but Radunsky (Table Manners, 2001, etc.) manages to do just that. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Without a doubt, one of the oddest monuments of Europe is the statue of the Manneken Pis ("Peeing Boy") in Brussels; here he stars in a decidedly odd original anti-war fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE by Vladimir Radunsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Kudos to Radunsky, for another verbal and visual blast laced with silliness and affection. (Picture book. 6-8)"
From the ten armadillos born in 10 (Ten): A Wonderful Story (2002), one raises his snout to proclaim himself Number One, in what Radunsky bills "a nice story about an awful braggart." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN by Vladimir Radunsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Blue-nosed adult armadillos, nattily attired in patterned ear and tail socks, tumble with the infants across monochrome backgrounds in this bright, amiable, universally recognizable episode. (Picture book. 4-5)"
Radunsky (Mannekin Pis, p. 961, etc.) tucks plenty of counting practice into this evergreen "family" story rich with Radunsky's offbeat humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU? by Vladimir Radunsky
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

A scruffy little white-with-brown-spots mutt is alone in the park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCARECROW by Vladimir Zheleznikov
Released: Oct. 30, 1990

In his first book to be published in English (it appeared in Moscow in 1983), a prize-winning, widely-translated Soviet author portrays a tragic universal phenomenon: the thoughtlessly vicious interaction of kids as they scapegoat one of their number. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Feb. 1, 1973

Ten years out of the typewriter, the master's own script, "not in pettish refutation of a munificent film but purely as a vivacious variant of an old novel" — a minor curiosity but undoubtedly a must have for Nabokovians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODBYE EVILWOOD by Vladimir Chernozemsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2006

"Though Bulgarian-born Chernozemsky (Phase One After Zero, not reviewed, etc.) is the author of 47 novels in five different languages, what he offers here is indifferently plotted and clumsily written."
She is, as the homicide detective points out, "very dead." But she isn't the starlet he thinks she is. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DESPAIR by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1966

"Nonetheless, Nabokov is one of the incomparable storytellers and stylists of our time who may outlive it."
Despair is one of Nabokov's Russian language novels now appearing here thirty years after At was written in the Germany of the '30's— of which The Gift has been isolated by many critics as the connoisseur's choice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Vuka by Vladimir Radovic
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 12, 2016

"A personal recollection and tribute that's loaded with engaging historical tidbits."
A family memoir that focuses on the life of an intrepid young woman who left her family in Montenegro to become a dedicated Alaskan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRANSPARENT THINGS by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1972

"But all in all there is no question that the artifice often veers into artificiality (remember Ada) and that what can only have been a minor diversion for Nabokov doesn't amount to more than a diddle, an occasional diddle."
Nabokov once remarked that his true cher lecteur would be "a little Nabokov"; it will only be the little Nabokov who will enjoy (and find familiar comfort in) the Nabokovisms which this slight novella so fully illustrates: the theme, to start with, those transparent things "through which the past shines" and once again memory speaks; the language full of those "nobiliary particles" and spackled with French and Russian as well as his own matchless vocabulary; and the ancillary love or lust — in Nabokov lechery is never more than a glint of the mind's eye. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1958

"Any bookseller should be very sure that he knows in advance that he is selling very literate pornography."
Nabokov is not unknown here. Read full book review >