Search Results: "Vladimir Nabokov"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"But for the reader it will awaken a great block of humanity. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Magnificent last volume of Boyd's critical biography of Vladimir Nabokov (Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years, 1990). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1989

"In other words, classic Nabokov."
Hilarious collection of letters by the Russian-American maestro that must rank as one of the most contentious and eccentric of all time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1989

"In other words, classic Nabokov."
Hilarious collection of letters by the Russian-American maestro that must rank as one of the most contentious and eccentric of all time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF VLADIMIR NABOKOV by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 30, 1995

"An indispensable book."
The collected short fiction of the great Russian-born writer (1899—1977) who became a master of fiction in three languages and whose imposingly irascible presence on the 20th-century literary scene has perhaps obscured full recognition of his genius as symbolist, savant, and storyteller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET HISTORY OF VLADIMIR NABOKOV by Andrea Pitzer
Released: March 13, 2013

"Though no substitute for Brian Boyd's definitive two-volume biography, this is a brilliant examination that adds to the understanding of an inspiring and enigmatic life."
Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) always claimed that art and politics don't mix, but this new biography suggests his own art tells a different story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LECTURES ON LITERATURE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Oct. 22, 1980

"Distinctive and demanding."
Not really essays, not genial and general E. M. Forster-ish talks either, nor stirring defenses nor rhetorical destructions, these lectures Nabokov prepared and gave at Cornell in the Fifties are just that: he talks and reads, we listen (the same general approach—heirophant picking out the mystery from the dross—that Nabokov used in his own fiction); and literature is taken apart like a boxful of toys: "impersonal imagination and artistic delight," "the supremacy of the detail over the general, of the part that is more alive than the whole." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PNIN by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 1957

"And why do books which have appeared in the New Yorker rarely get proper editing, so that the reader is constantly having people and events re-explained to him?"
This sad-amusing little book is a series of short stories about Professor Timofey Pnin, an emigre Russian intellectual and teacher of Russian at Waindell College. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 21, 1984

"Indifferent playwrighting, mildly provocative essays: a minor addition to the Nabokov shelf."
Two essays on drama highlight this rather marginal contribution to the Nabokov oeuvre—and Nabokov approaches theater in a dismissive, acerbic humor, much as he approached Russian literature in the recently published Lectures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1981

"In any case, it's a disappointing follow-up to the previous, dazzling Lectures—with only one great essay (available elsewhere) and much of the space taken up by over-extensive excerpts."
These 1950s Cornell lectures address a subject on which you would expect Nabokov to be nonpareil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DETAILS OF A SUNSET AND OTHER STORIES by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1976

"Up to then, however, the collection offers only occasional reading for the complete Nabokovian—small butterflies which just take wing as retrospect or in anticipation."
Everything, every trifle will be valuable and meaningful" as someone's "future recollection"—this line is a validation for many of these thirteen stories written between 1924 and 1935 for various Russian emigre publications. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TYRANTS DESTROYED AND OTHER STORIES by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1974

"Russian or English, early or mature, the voice and manner are cultivated, elegant and composed in that unique Nabokovian mix of hauteur and human understanding."
Thirteen not-so-new stories from the audacious doyen of self-conscious artifice — twelve of them dated between 1924 and 1939 from Berlin, Paris, Mentone, and portraying the proud but slightly down at the heels international community of Russian emigres. Read full book review >