Search Results: "Vladimir Nabokov"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"But for the reader it will awaken a great block of humanity. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Magnificent last volume of Boyd's critical biography of Vladimir Nabokov (Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years, 1990). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1989

"In other words, classic Nabokov."
Hilarious collection of letters by the Russian-American maestro that must rank as one of the most contentious and eccentric of all time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1989

"In other words, classic Nabokov."
Hilarious collection of letters by the Russian-American maestro that must rank as one of the most contentious and eccentric of all time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF VLADIMIR NABOKOV by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 30, 1995

"An indispensable book."
The collected short fiction of the great Russian-born writer (1899—1977) who became a master of fiction in three languages and whose imposingly irascible presence on the 20th-century literary scene has perhaps obscured full recognition of his genius as symbolist, savant, and storyteller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET HISTORY OF VLADIMIR NABOKOV by Andrea Pitzer
Released: March 13, 2013

"Though no substitute for Brian Boyd's definitive two-volume biography, this is a brilliant examination that adds to the understanding of an inspiring and enigmatic life."
Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) always claimed that art and politics don't mix, but this new biography suggests his own art tells a different story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LECTURES ON LITERATURE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Oct. 22, 1980

"Distinctive and demanding."
Not really essays, not genial and general E. M. Forster-ish talks either, nor stirring defenses nor rhetorical destructions, these lectures Nabokov prepared and gave at Cornell in the Fifties are just that: he talks and reads, we listen (the same general approach—heirophant picking out the mystery from the dross—that Nabokov used in his own fiction); and literature is taken apart like a boxful of toys: "impersonal imagination and artistic delight," "the supremacy of the detail over the general, of the part that is more alive than the whole." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PNIN by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 1957

"And why do books which have appeared in the New Yorker rarely get proper editing, so that the reader is constantly having people and events re-explained to him?"
This sad-amusing little book is a series of short stories about Professor Timofey Pnin, an emigre Russian intellectual and teacher of Russian at Waindell College. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LECTURES ON DON QUIXOTE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Feb. 25, 1982

"But the bon mots here are scarce, and the book is little more than an acerbic, uninvolved study-guide—for Nabokov fanatics only."
Quite the least interesting, most dutiful of Nabokov's collegiate lectures on literature, these talks on Don Quixote were given at Harvard, 1951-52. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Feb. 1, 1973

Ten years out of the typewriter, the master's own script, "not in pettish refutation of a munificent film but purely as a vivacious variant of an old novel" — a minor curiosity but undoubtedly a must have for Nabokovians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRANSPARENT THINGS by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1972

"But all in all there is no question that the artifice often veers into artificiality (remember Ada) and that what can only have been a minor diversion for Nabokov doesn't amount to more than a diddle, an occasional diddle."
Nabokov once remarked that his true cher lecteur would be "a little Nabokov"; it will only be the little Nabokov who will enjoy (and find familiar comfort in) the Nabokovisms which this slight novella so fully illustrates: the theme, to start with, those transparent things "through which the past shines" and once again memory speaks; the language full of those "nobiliary particles" and spackled with French and Russian as well as his own matchless vocabulary; and the ancillary love or lust — in Nabokov lechery is never more than a glint of the mind's eye. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DESPAIR by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1966

"Nonetheless, Nabokov is one of the incomparable storytellers and stylists of our time who may outlive it."
Despair is one of Nabokov's Russian language novels now appearing here thirty years after At was written in the Germany of the '30's— of which The Gift has been isolated by many critics as the connoisseur's choice. Read full book review >