Search Results: "Vladimir Nabokov"


BOOK REVIEW

PNIN by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 1957

"And why do books which have appeared in the New Yorker rarely get proper editing, so that the reader is constantly having people and events re-explained to him?"
This sad-amusing little book is a series of short stories about Professor Timofey Pnin, an emigre Russian intellectual and teacher of Russian at Waindell College. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LECTURES ON LITERATURE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Oct. 22, 1980

"Distinctive and demanding."
Not really essays, not genial and general E. M. Forster-ish talks either, nor stirring defenses nor rhetorical destructions, these lectures Nabokov prepared and gave at Cornell in the Fifties are just that: he talks and reads, we listen (the same general approach—heirophant picking out the mystery from the dross—that Nabokov used in his own fiction); and literature is taken apart like a boxful of toys: "impersonal imagination and artistic delight," "the supremacy of the detail over the general, of the part that is more alive than the whole." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1958

"Any bookseller should be very sure that he knows in advance that he is selling very literate pornography."
Nabokov is not unknown here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRANSPARENT THINGS by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1972

"But all in all there is no question that the artifice often veers into artificiality (remember Ada) and that what can only have been a minor diversion for Nabokov doesn't amount to more than a diddle, an occasional diddle."
Nabokov once remarked that his true cher lecteur would be "a little Nabokov"; it will only be the little Nabokov who will enjoy (and find familiar comfort in) the Nabokovisms which this slight novella so fully illustrates: the theme, to start with, those transparent things "through which the past shines" and once again memory speaks; the language full of those "nobiliary particles" and spackled with French and Russian as well as his own matchless vocabulary; and the ancillary love or lust — in Nabokov lechery is never more than a glint of the mind's eye. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LECTURES ON DON QUIXOTE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Feb. 25, 1982

"But the bon mots here are scarce, and the book is little more than an acerbic, uninvolved study-guide—for Nabokov fanatics only."
Quite the least interesting, most dutiful of Nabokov's collegiate lectures on literature, these talks on Don Quixote were given at Harvard, 1951-52. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GLORY by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1971

"No 'ideas,' of course, just echoes and nuances and matchless phrases."
A toast to Nabokov! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KING, QUEEN, KNAVE by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 13, 1968

"However, in terms of the general reader, this is one of his most open-faced entertainments and while Nabokov really plays the hand, he does so in a jauntily diabolical fashion."
This is Nabokov's second novel, written in 1928, which he has recently retouched and which he presents here in a new introduction as his "gayest." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONCLUSIVE EVIDENCE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Jan. 1, 1951

"Most of the stories have appeared in The New Yorker, others were first printed in Monthly and the Review For a specified market."
Charming, incisive, but never biting remembrances from the author's past when he was action of a wealthy St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PALE FIRE by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 1962

"Count on intellectual snob appeal."
Another wholly different, baffling, brilliant book, full of word plays and tricky meanings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1981

"In any case, it's a disappointing follow-up to the previous, dazzling Lectures—with only one great essay (available elsewhere) and much of the space taken up by over-extensive excerpts."
These 1950s Cornell lectures address a subject on which you would expect Nabokov to be nonpareil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DETAILS OF A SUNSET AND OTHER STORIES by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1976

"Up to then, however, the collection offers only occasional reading for the complete Nabokovian—small butterflies which just take wing as retrospect or in anticipation."
Everything, every trifle will be valuable and meaningful" as someone's "future recollection"—this line is a validation for many of these thirteen stories written between 1924 and 1935 for various Russian emigre publications. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TYRANTS DESTROYED AND OTHER STORIES by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1974

"Russian or English, early or mature, the voice and manner are cultivated, elegant and composed in that unique Nabokovian mix of hauteur and human understanding."
Thirteen not-so-new stories from the audacious doyen of self-conscious artifice — twelve of them dated between 1924 and 1939 from Berlin, Paris, Mentone, and portraying the proud but slightly down at the heels international community of Russian emigres. Read full book review >