Search Results: "Vladimir Radunsky"


BOOK REVIEW

TEN by Vladimir Radunsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Blue-nosed adult armadillos, nattily attired in patterned ear and tail socks, tumble with the infants across monochrome backgrounds in this bright, amiable, universally recognizable episode. (Picture book. 4-5)"
Radunsky (Mannekin Pis, p. 961, etc.) tucks plenty of counting practice into this evergreen "family" story rich with Radunsky's offbeat humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"It is hard to imagine anyone being able to pull this very odd offering off—but Radunsky (Table Manners, 2001, etc.) manages to do just that. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Without a doubt, one of the oddest monuments of Europe is the statue of the Manneken Pis ("Peeing Boy") in Brussels; here he stars in a decidedly odd original anti-war fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE by Vladimir Radunsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Kudos to Radunsky, for another verbal and visual blast laced with silliness and affection. (Picture book. 6-8)"
From the ten armadillos born in 10 (Ten): A Wonderful Story (2002), one raises his snout to proclaim himself Number One, in what Radunsky bills "a nice story about an awful braggart." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU? by Vladimir Radunsky
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

A scruffy little white-with-brown-spots mutt is alone in the park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL MEETS BOY/BOY MEETS GIRL by Chris Raschka
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"It's utterly brilliant in its simplicity and daring, but it remains to be seen whether concretely thinking preschoolers will be won over by the dovetailing of the narratives—or just plain mystified. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Boy meets girl and girl meets boy in a bidirectional experiment that busts linear narrative to smithereens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAESTRO PLAYS by Bill Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"The effect is circus-like, a vertiginous celebration of sound and color. (Fiction/Picture book. 3-7)"
Two maestros play here—one with words, the other with color, form, and space—in what is one of the most visually emphatic picture books of the year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YUCKA DRUCKA DRONI by Vladimir Radunsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"The effect is lively, not jangling, with good humor to see readers through every noisy snarl. (Picture book. 3-6)"
This subversive tongue-twister from the Radunskys involves three brothers, three sisters, three weddings, and three babies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON A BEAM OF LIGHT by Jennifer Berne
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2013

"For today's curious children, this intriguing and accessible blend of words and pictures will provide a splendid introduction to a man who never stopped questioning. (Picture book/biography. 6-9)"
A boy who asked too many questions becomes iconic physicist Albert Einstein, whose questions changed the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIP HOP DOG by Chris Raschka
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2010

A neglected pup raps a bravado-laced memoir that chronicles his life on the street and gradual embrace of hip-hop culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVICE TO LITTLE GIRLS by Mark Twain
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 12, 2013

"An elegant curiosity for admirers of Twain, Radunsky or both. (Picture book. 6 & up)"
Crisply satirical and a little subversive, Twain's short, acerbic sendup slyly exhorts little girls to take a calculating approach to manipulating friends, brothers and elders. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALPHABETABUM by Chris Raschka
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"An intriguing concept waylaid by snark. (Picture book. 5-7)"
This collaboration pairs compelling vintage photographs of children, chosen from Radunsky's extensive collection, with Raschka's 26 flippant, three-line verses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWDI DO by Woody Guthrie
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2000

"Along with 1998's edition of This Land Is Your Land, illustrated by Kathy Jacobsen, here's proof that both the breadth and the depth of vision in Guthrie's music can survive the transition to another medium. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Radunsky (An Edward Lear Alphabet, 1999, etc.) suspends collage people constructed with large pieces of brightly colored, painted, or patterned paper over infectiously feel-good lyrics that invite readers and listeners to "stick out your little hand to every woman, kid and man," while singing out the "Howjee, heejee, hijee, hojee, how di do, sir, doodle doo" nonsense chorus. Read full book review >