Search Results: "Vladimir Todorov"


BOOK REVIEW

OLIVER'S TANTRUMS by Boriana Todorov
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 27, 2013

"Definitely a book aimed at high-energy boys. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Photorealistic, vibrantly colored, sometimes-disturbing images tell an amped-up story of sibling jealousy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN by Vladimir Radunsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Blue-nosed adult armadillos, nattily attired in patterned ear and tail socks, tumble with the infants across monochrome backgrounds in this bright, amiable, universally recognizable episode. (Picture book. 4-5)"
Radunsky (Mannekin Pis, p. 961, etc.) tucks plenty of counting practice into this evergreen "family" story rich with Radunsky's offbeat humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PETER AND THE WOLF by Vladimir  Vagin
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"The exciting illustrations give another context to a modern folktale than can co-exist with the symphony that first made it famous. (Picture book. 4-7)"
An adventurous boy disregards his grandfather's orders to remain behind the closed garden gate when a fierce wolf is spotted in the neighborhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LECTURES ON LITERATURE by Vladimir Nabokov
Released: Oct. 22, 1980

"Distinctive and demanding."
Not really essays, not genial and general E. M. Forster-ish talks either, nor stirring defenses nor rhetorical destructions, these lectures Nabokov prepared and gave at Cornell in the Fifties are just that: he talks and reads, we listen (the same general approach—heirophant picking out the mystery from the dross—that Nabokov used in his own fiction); and literature is taken apart like a boxful of toys: "impersonal imagination and artistic delight," "the supremacy of the detail over the general, of the part that is more alive than the whole." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 20, 1991

"Somewhere, Gogol is smiling."
Unique and sparkling memoir of a Russian Jewish immigrant to New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1996

"If Zhirinovsky does well in upcoming elections, the West and the world will have to deal with yet another fanatical nationalist whose grip on reality is tenuous at best."
Depending on the outcome of the upcoming presidential elections in Russia, this political manifesto will prove either ridiculous or frightening. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONQUEST OF CANCER by Vladimir Kalina
NON-FICTION
Released: May 2, 2017

"A convincing criticism of modern medicine that advocates the reinvention of cancer treatment."
A debut author looks at a rare surgical technique for combating cancer developed over decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PNIN by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 1957

"And why do books which have appeared in the New Yorker rarely get proper editing, so that the reader is constantly having people and events re-explained to him?"
This sad-amusing little book is a series of short stories about Professor Timofey Pnin, an emigre Russian intellectual and teacher of Russian at Waindell College. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"His lessons for us today are compelling and ineluctable. (Author tour)"
An incisive, at times controversial, consideration of moral action in the face of dehumanization, and its implications for everyday life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 3, 1992

"Readers interested in the extraordinary events of 1989 would do better to look at Mark Frankland's The Patriots' Revolution (reviewed above)."
A rather dry account of the failure of Communism in Eastern Europe, told by an expatriate Romanian academic (Political Science/Univ. of Maryland)—long on background, well documented, but plodding as narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE HOLD by Vladimir Arsenijevic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 1996

"Either way, what results is a protagonist in whom it's impossible to take much interest, and a novel so rarefied and unspecific that it seems, despite its brevity, an ordeal to read."
A strangely uninvolving first novel—a muted, discursive portrayal of alienation and anomie set in Belgrade in 1991—that won for its young author the NIN Prize, the ``highest literary honor'' given in the now dissolved nation of Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TYRANTS DESTROYED AND OTHER STORIES by Vladimir Nabokov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1974

"Russian or English, early or mature, the voice and manner are cultivated, elegant and composed in that unique Nabokovian mix of hauteur and human understanding."
Thirteen not-so-new stories from the audacious doyen of self-conscious artifice — twelve of them dated between 1924 and 1939 from Berlin, Paris, Mentone, and portraying the proud but slightly down at the heels international community of Russian emigres. Read full book review >