Search Results: "Wafa Sultan"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 2009

"Forged in justifiable anger, this flamethrower of a book will hold the reader's attention with its heat, but it occasionally singes targets indiscriminately."
A Syrian-born psychiatrist argues that "Muslims hate their women…because their god does." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEVEN WISE PRINCESSES by Wafa’ Tarnowska
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Exotic in tone and a pleasure to look upon. (Folklore. 10-14)"
The 12th-century Persian Sufi poet Nizami lived in what is now Azerbaijan, where his grave is still a place of pilgrimage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELP LINE by Faye Sultan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 19, 1999

"A particular shame in this synthetic sequel is that what looks like the most original variation on the serial-killer formula—the duplicitous reporter bent on discrediting the heroine—turns out to be just more of the same old same old."
Another dogged forensic psychologist tracks another serial killer, and vice versa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNNY'S NIGHTS by Tim Sultan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Sultan has a terrific subject in Sunny and his semilegendary watering hole, but the approach is too cute."
An insider's look at a sui generis Brooklyn institution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS by Wafa’ Tarnowska
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2010

"Hénaff's stylized scenes of domed cityscapes and turbaned figures add properly whimsical visual notes to this short but animated gathering. (Folktales. 10-12)"
In a large, handsome format, Tarnowska offers six tales plus an abbreviated version of the frame story, retold in formal but contemporary language and sandwiched between a note on the Nights' place in her childhood in Lebanon and a page of glossary and source notes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OVER THE LINE by Faye Sultan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Realistically rough in the early going, then, but hampered by a fatal lack of invention."
A forensic psychologist struggles to prove that the killer of two old women was insane, in a fact-based case courtesy of Kennedy (Welcome to the End of the World: Prophecy, Rage and the New Age, p. 854, etc.) and first-novelist Sultan. Read full book review >