Search Results: "Walter Benjamin"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1994

Demanding yet eloquent and immensely rewarding personal documents of one of the century's leading literary and aesthetic critics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"While there is some overlap with existing editors, this new Benjamin set will be the standard work. (For a biography of Benjamin, see Brodersen, p. 1436.)"
A cause for excitement among literary essayists and critics: Walter Benjamin's scattered works are at last being translated and collected in a carefully edited edition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ARCADES PROJECT by Walter Benjamin
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"As it stands, it is merely brilliant."
A heavy book, to say the least, from one of the exiting century's greatest thinkers, Walter Benjamin (Selected Writings, Vol. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMPLETE CORRESPONDENCE, 1928-1940 by Theodor W. Adorno
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 10, 1999

"While the absence of a comprehensive editorial introduction outlining major landmarks in their biographies and careers is unfortunate, these letters do let Benjamin and Adorno speak eloquently for themselves on many complex issues."
Letters exchanged between 1928 and 1940 by two prominent German intellectuals and scholars of literature, music, and culture, Walter Benjamin and Theodor Wiesengrund-Adorno, now published in their entirety for the first time in English. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAR'S SONG by Benjamin Chaud
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 17, 2013

"This extraordinary picture book, first published in France as Une chanson d'ours (2011), is as happy a surprise as finding a honey-filled hive at the end of a fur-raising journey. (Picture book. 2-8)"
Hibernation is for grown-ups—Little Bear has adventure on his mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHERRY AND OLIVE by Benjamin Lacombe
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Told and illustrated in a restrained way, the episode may make heartening reading for sensitive children. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Shy, chubby bookworm that she is, Cherry leads a lonely existence until she meets a mournful-looking Shar Pei in her father's animal shelter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FACE by Benjamin Zephaniah
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Nonetheless, a worthy subject that should give kids plenty to think about. (Fiction. 10+)"
Looks may not be everything, but few high-school students would deny that physical appearance is connected to self-esteem and social standing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 30, 1996

"These concise, introspective epilogues round out the self- portrait of a warm if wary individual with a lively, inquiring mind. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
The engrossing personal and emotional reminiscences of a master of the investment game, one whose canon remains as influential and useful today as when it was first codified over six decades ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PLAGIARIST by Benjamin Cheever
Released: May 1, 1992

"Otherwise, the plot—and the prose—lumber along to no great literary purpose."
John Cheever's son, a former editor at Reader's Digest, debuts in fiction with a novel about a famous writer's son who works as an editor at a magazine just like—what else?—Reader's Digest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WILDING by Benjamin Percy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Unsatisfying, both as suspense and as an inquiry into our violent impulses."
Will a family camping trip turn deadly? Don't hold your breath. Percy's first novel, after two story collections (Refresh, Refresh, 2007, etc.), is a painfully slow tease. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"DeMott argues his case persuasively in this important book, a clarion call to those still willing to consider the lessons of history before TV and advertising erase them completely."
DeMott (The Imperial Middle, 1990, etc.), having explored America's inability to face issues of class, now turns his considerable intelligence to our other dirty little secret, race. Read full book review >