Search Results: "Walter Dean Myers"


BOOK REVIEW

GLORIOUS ANGELS by Walter Dean Myers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1995

"A gilt lily. (Picture book. 4-10)"
A disappointing followup to the sensational Brown Angels (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON A CLEAR DAY by Walter Dean Myers
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"A clarion call from a beloved, much-missed master. (Science fiction. 12-16)"
Myers issues a rebellious call to action that chronicles how seven diverse teenagers respond to injustice in a globalized not-so-distant future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNRISE OVER FALLUJAH by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2008

"Robin's eventual understanding that his experience was not about winning or losing the war but about 'reaching for the highest idea of life' makes this a worthy successor to Myers's Coretta Scott King Award-winning classic. (Fiction. 12+)"
In 2003, in the early days of Operation Iraqi Freedom, young Robin Perry already wonders about "an enemy we can't identify and friends we're not sure about." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIOT by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 2009

"Another innovative work by an author constantly stretching the boundaries of what fiction can be, and a natural for readers' theater in the classroom. (Historical fiction. 11 & up)"
In a screenplay format similar to his groundbreaking Monster (2000), Myers tells the story of the Civil War Draft Riots in New York City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 31, 2000

"What emerges most clearly is a portrait of a complex, compelling spokesman who was growing and changing up to the moment he was cut down. (Picture book/biography. 6-8)"
With but a light sprinkling of names and dates, Myers condenses his Malcolm X: By Any Means Necessary (1993) to picture- book length. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARNELL ROCK REPORTING by Walter Dean Myers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Many readers—and not just those in multiracial, big-city areas like the one depicted here—will recognize themselves in Darnell and his friends. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Darnell isn't bad, but he meets his teachers' (and his own) expectations by earning poor grades and getting into trouble for his attitude. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 30, 1991

"For Americans of any color, he makes a notably persuasive case for doing both. (Nonfiction. 11+)"
What happens when a gifted novelist (Scorpions, 1988, Newbery Honor) chooses to write the story of his people? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES OF A DEAD KING by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1983

"Unlike more strenuous efforts, the one grows on you by degrees."
Rudimentary skulduggery on an Egyptian archaeological dig—for kids who take to Myers' no-frills storytelling, simple set-ups, and good sense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEET ILLUSIONS by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1987

"There's no physical violence or drug abuse here, but these tales are nonetheless very scary, and adolescent readers will find them involving and disturbing."
An intellectual and emotional workbook for teen-agers on the subject of pregnancy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WON'T KNOW TILL I GET THERE by Walter Dean Myers
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 3, 1982

"Another of Myers' winning, medium-cool raps in the service of good old-fashioned values."
Like The Young Landlords who found themselves responsible to the diverse elderly tenants of a rundown tenement, Myers' latest group of wholesome early teenagers spends a summer helping out at a neighborhood old-people's home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ME, MOP, AND THE MOONDANCE KID by Walter Dean Myers
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 1, 1988

"An easily enjoyed story, yet thoughtful, perceptive, and possessing real depth."
Myers' third fine book this year—unlike Fallen Angels (p. 696/C- 114) and Scorpions (p. 764/C-126)—is relatively light-hearted, involving kids playing Little League baseball near Jersey City, N.J. Still—though the exciting play-by-play games will satisfy sports buffs—narrator T.J. tells more than a baseball story. Read full book review >