Search Results: "Walter Laqueur"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 16, 1993

"Laqueur brings to this study an incomparable knowledge, sureness of touch, and deftness of judgment that make it far more than just an analysis of the role of the Russian right. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs)"
From prolific Russian scholar Laqueur (Stalin and Soviet Union 2000, both 1990, etc): a path-breaking analysis of the extreme right in Russia, including a thoughtful and plausible prediction of its role in that country's future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 4, 1993

"Laqueur—calm, canny, humane, and willing to say the unpopular thing—stands here as a highly credible witness to history. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Vivid memoirs by veteran historian Laqueur (Stalin, 1990, etc.), who witnessed the era of Adolf Hitler, the founding of Israel, and much more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 27, 1989

Laqueur, a Soviet watcher for nearly a half century, now takes a close-up look at glasnost—and adds to an already impressive legacy of books including The Age of Terrorism, A History of Zionism, and Weimar. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"A sobering analysis of geopolitics and current events."
"To be hated is a consequence of being great and powerful. It can be remedied not by becoming gentler, only by becoming weaker." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A clear guide to understanding and solving a profound set of problems."
Laqueur (Harvest of a Decade: Disraelia and Other Essays, 2011, etc.), the chairman of the International Research Council of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, draws on past history and current insight to present a profile of the current European crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Not always well organized, but wide-ranging, learned, and full of the insights of a lifetime of scholarship."
An expert pathologist's report on the death of the Soviet Union. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FASCISM by Walter Laqueur
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1996

"With a conclusion devoted to the prospects for fascism in the future and a valuable bibliographical note, the book is a welcome addition at a time when we are witnessing the revival of a political force once written off as extinct."
A wide-ranging study of the many faces of fascism, by one of America's foremost historians (The Dream That Failed: Reflections on the Soviet Union, 1994, etc.). ``Although fascism is dead,'' Laqueur notes in his introduction, ``it could have a second coming.'' In an attempt to describe the seemingly persistent appeal of the concept, he considers its history, evolution, and a variety of current manifestations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUTINISM by Walter Laqueur
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 30, 2015

"An erudite and unsettling but convincing argument that the new Russia is a dictatorship 'approved by the majority as long as the going is good,' and if Putin were to vanish today, his successor would make few changes."
Relief at the end of the Cold War lasted barely a decade before observers began wondering if it was returning, this time under a pugnacious, quasi-Stalin: Vladimir Putin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 18, 2003

"Sheds bright light on an aspect of human behavior hitherto relegated to history's shadows. (32 b&w illustrations)"
Scholarly examination of the evolution of public perceptions about masturbation, from a threat to the civil order in the early-18th century to a form of cyberspace expression in the 21st. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN YOU SEE WHAT I SEE?  TOYLAND EXPRESS by Walter Wick
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"No puzzle here—these well-designed scenes are another success from the picture-challenge master. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Complex seek-and-find images provide an intriguing backdrop for the story of a tenacious toy train. Read full book review >