Search Results: "Walter Mosley"


BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE SCARLET by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2004

"The real strength of Easy's narrative, though, is his unflinching recognition that in working with the police, he's crossing the same border that's driven his brothers and sisters to violence."
Easy Rawlins sizzles as Watts burns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK BETTY by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1994

"This latest installment, teeming with violence, bitterness, and compassion, is Mosley's finest work yet."
It's 1961, and Easy Rawlins has lost most of what he had five years ago in White Butterfly (1992). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE GREEN by Walter Mosley
Released: May 14, 2013

"Whether it's the lingering effects of his near-fatal accident or the infusions of Gator's Blood, Easy sounds less like Watts' signature private eye than one of the visionaries from Mosley's Crosstown to Oblivion novellas (Stepping Stone/The Love Machine, 2013, etc.)."
The 1967 Watts riots seem to have slowed down time for Easy Rawlins, who returns only a few weeks after his apparent death at the end of Blonde Faith (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LITTLE YELLOW DOG by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1996

"But no living novelist beats Mosley's nervy sense of what thin ice the solidest-seeming characters build their lives upon, and how terrifying it is to feel the surface crack and shiver."
Easy Rawlins has been working for two years as a supervising custodian in Sojourner Truth Junior High School when he finds alluring math teacher Idabell Turner in her classroom much too early one morning for anything but trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIABLERIE by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"Provocative, haunting, satisfyingly inconclusive work from a storyteller of formidable gifts and boundless ambition."
A disturbing chance encounter jolts a New York computer programmer out of his affectless routine and into the turbulent what-next zone in which Mosley's heroes from Easy Rawlins to Fearless Jones have always thrived. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"Even when his rhetoric is trite, however, Mosley is always engaged and engaging."
An eloquent if clichéd essay on black and white Americans' slavery to the economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAD BOY BRAWLY BROWN by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2002

"Helping his brothers only because nobody else will, he returns from his six-year sabbatical more complex and compelling than ever before: a hero for his time and ours."
In a rare slowing of his usual leaps forward in time, Mosley, who's chronicled the adventures of reluctant Watts detective Ezekiel Rawlins from 1948 (Devil in a Blue Dress, 1990) to 1963 (A Little Yellow Dog, 1996), edges forward only three months to tell the story of Easy's search for Brawly Brown, the hulking young man who ran away from his mother, Alva Torres, smack into trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAN IN MY BASEMENT by Walter Mosley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 5, 2004

In Mosley's boldly understated fable, an unemployed African-American agrees to rent space in his basement to a wealthy white businessman for two months. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TEMPEST TALES by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2008

"A classic case of overreaching, though one that's often moving and provoking."
Versatile Mosley tells the story of a black man dead before his time who shakes up the divine order by refusing his condemnation to Hell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALWAYS OUTNUMBERED, ALWAYS OUTGUNNED by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"The elemental recurrence of fear and lust and rage are right out of Easy Rawlins, even if Socrates' story exhibits rather than extends Mosley's range."
Mosley takes a break from his peerless Easy Rawlins series (Gone Fishin', 1997, etc.) for a cycle of non-mystery stories set in the same violent neighborhood of Watts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RL'S DREAM by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 1995

"About what you'd expect if Flannery O'Connor had had the time to expand 'Judgment Day' to novel length: as dark and rich as the Easy Rawlins stories, but without the persistent lure of Easy's search for the truth."
Mosley's Easy Rawlins mysteries (Black Betty, 1994, etc.) always seemed to be moving away from tightly plotted whodunits toward his trademark high-energy riffs, and here he makes his move to the mainstream with a hazy, tender tale of a dying bluesman taken in by a hard-bitten urban survivalist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GONE FISHIN' by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"No mystery, but a densely imagined prologue that goes a long way toward explaining why Easy spends so much of his adult life hamstrung by his deepest loyalties, as if every friendship were a life sentence."
Fans of Easy Rawlins who worry that he's been growing old too fast—Mosley's five novels from Devil in a Blue Dress (1990) to A Little Yellow Dog (p. 565) have carried him from 1948 to 1963—will be happy to have this prequel set in 1939, a slender coming-of-age story that takes Easy and his violent friend Raymond (Mouse) Alexander from their boyhood home in Houston's Fifth Ward to the aptly named town of Pariah, where Mouse plans to squeeze money out of his stepfather, Reese Corn, to underwrite his marriage to his sweetheart EttaMae. Read full book review >