Search Results: "Walter Williams"


BOOK REVIEW

The Bicycle Garden by Walter Williams
written and illustrated by Walter Williams
Released: Jan. 23, 2013

"A charming picture book, full of visual appeal, which may become a family favorite."
Lively, colorful illustrations enhance this family bedtime story about bicycles and magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIRTHDAY ELEPHANT by Walter Williams
Released: March 10, 2015

"Young children will enjoy this picture book's unlikely story of can-do empowerment, dreams, and friendship, but its illustrations could have used some refinement."
In Williams' (A Monster for Tea, 2013, etc.) offbeat picture book, an adventurous young pachyderm experiences numerous delights thanks to a kindhearted boy with a talent for construction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MONSTER FOR TEA by Walter Williams
Released: Dec. 3, 2013

"A simple story that will charm little ones and diminish some of the terror surrounding monsters."
In Williams' children's book, a little girl and a monster begin an unlikely friendship in a story about keeping an open mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARISTOI by Walter Jon Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 25, 1992

"Space opera with brains and panache—tough, fast-moving, and very well written."
Often pigeonholed with the cyberpunks for such novels as Angel Station (1989), Williams showed his versatility in Facets (1990). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOURTH WALL by Walter Jon Williams
Released: Feb. 13, 2012

"Williams and Dagmar fans will rejoice, and it should attract the near-futurists and techno-thriller crowd as well."
Another tale about AR (augmented reality) games designer Dagmar Shaw (Deep State, 2011, etc). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMPLIED SPACES by Walter Jon Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 2008

"An intelligent, delicate and precise novel of real depth: a pleasure to read, an undertaking to savor."
From Williams (Conventions of War, 2005, etc.), a far-future science-fiction yarn that employs sword-and-sorcery trappings to investigate philosophical questions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAYS OF ATONEMENT by Walter Jon Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 18, 1991

"What won't appeal to the kinder, gentler sections of the audience are the local of feminine interest, the callous monomania displayed by most of the cast, and the gratuitously overblown violence of the windup."
From the author of the splendid Voice of the Whirlwind (1987) and the less pleasing Angel Station (1989), a mainstream- ish tale of a traditional New Mexico police chief propelled headlong into a future he can barely understand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROCK OF AGES by Walter Jon Williams
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Adroitly handled but flatly unamusing: not one of Williams's (Metropolitan, etc.) better prospects."
First hardcover appearance for an established paperback series (House of Shards, 1988, etc.) about Drake Maijstral, the top-rated Allowed Burglar in the Human Constellation that shares the galaxy, now amicably, with the alien Khosali Empire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

METROPOLITAN by Walter Jon Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1995

"The upshot is, by Williams's own high standards, unsatisfying."
For thousands of years, the Earth has been enclosed by an impervious Shield raised by the long-vanished Ascended Ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY ON FIRE by Walter Jon Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Broadly similar to its predecessor, with the same faults and virtues: fascinating scenario, solid storytelling, mediocre characters, and a disconnected, deeply unsatisfying present-tense narrative."
Direct, independently intelligible sequel to the intriguing Metropolitan (1995), set in a world encaged by an impregnable Shield raised by the mysterious Ascended Ones, where ancient buildings and structures generate a marvelous energy called ``plasm'' (which does, though, bear a curious resemblance to John Shirley's IAMton particles). Read full book review >