Search Results: "Wanda Langley"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 15, 2006

Recent attention paid to pioneer women pilots, long overdue, has produced both individual and collective biographies; this salute to their enterprising spirits flies above the rest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WANDA GÁG by Deborah Kogan Ray
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

Wanda Gág's millions and billions and trillions of fans will be as enthralled by her true life's story as they are by her made-up ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOMER & LANGLEY by E.L. Doctorow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Usually a master at incorporating history into rich fiction, Doctorow offers few insights here and a narrator/hero who is never more than a cipher."
Brothers live together in a decaying New York City mansion as history marches on in the latest from Doctorow (The March, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WANDA AND THE FROGS by Barbara Azore
ANIMALS
Released: March 13, 2007

"Azore's substantial text palatably folds in a bit of educational information, and Graham's warm, subtle pastels merit multiple viewings. (Picture book. 5-8)"
While walking through a park, young Wanda finds a puddle, made by the melting snow, full of tadpoles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVING WANDA BEAVER by Alison Baker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Overall, then, a charming, graceful collection."
A quirky, diffuse, and quietly satisfying second collection from the author of How I Came West, and Why I Stayed (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHATEVER WANDA WANTED by Jude Wisdom
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"Simply fun from a great new artist. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Wanda's parents love her so much that they give her everything she wants, but their generosity has some bad, if predictable, side effects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO IN HELL IS WANDA FUCA by G.M. Ford
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 26, 1995

"First-novelist Ford does less well, though, treating all his characters—including the allegedly unforgettable spitfire Caroline—as so many faceless floaters."
It's not a who, it's where—the Strait of Juan de Fuca in Seattle—and its patron saint is raffish shamus Leo Waterman, whose politico father used to hang with the likes of aging mobster Tim Flood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISSING! by Jonathan Langley
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"And his warm-hearted illustrations make the whole episode a spoonful of sweet medicine. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A pair of feverish imaginations work their respective owners into swivets in this gently amusing story of crossed signals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERSISTENT RUMOURS by Lee Langley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Readers who have guessed the end have probably guessed wrong, while those who resisted guesswork won't be able to put the book down."
This latest offering from British author Langley (From the Broken Tree, 1978, etc.) again straddles the boundaries of pulp and serious fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RITS by Wanda Boeke
by Wanda Boeke, translated by Wanda Boeke
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2008

"Despite the stress, the boy's honest and often amusing depictions of his feelings and observations will leave readers smiling. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Diaries are for girls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OWW! by Michael Rosen
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2005

"A comic tale, with several views of piglets flying through the air and a mild lesson about never refusing help. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Fans of Snore! (2001) will welcome this return to the same barnyard full of helpful animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUMPELSTILTSKIN by Jonathan Langley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 1992

"Not essential, but an entertaining update, attractively produced. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
Somewhat in the manner of James Marshall's humorous renditions of favorite tales, but with iconoclastic additions freely incorporated into the spritely retelling (``Spin this straw into gold...or you will be fed to the Royal Crocodiles'')- -including a novel postcript: once the baby is saved, ``Ruby'' becomes a good Queen who takes over the royal duties, ``leaving the King to count his treasure''; her greedy husband eventually falls into the crocodile pool with a bag of gold and is ``never seen again.'' The lighthearted tone extends to the illustrations, where the characters all look like cheerful children; even Rumpelstiltskin is a merry elf with hardly a mischievous gleam in his eye. Read full book review >