Search Results: "Wayne Anderson"


BOOK REVIEW

DRAGON by Wayne Anderson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 8, 1992

Once again, a creature hatches, seeks its mother among unlike animals, and eventually finds her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE MOON DOG by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2007

"Young children will pore over the art, cheer at the climactic happy reunion and take Ward's point that 'there is nothing quite so NASTY as a fickle FAIRY and nothing quite so NICE as a faithful FRIEND.' (Picture book. 6-8)"
Fairies and exotic landscapes rendered with Rackham-esque depth illustrate this handsomely designed tale of a pet who falls among risky friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET WORLD OF MAGIC by Rosalind Kerven
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Eurocentric slant aside (in her cameo, the Native-American Spider Woman has blond hair and European features), this joins the likes of Monika Beisner's Secret Spells and Curious Charms (1985) as prime browsing material for young dreamers. (bibliography) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
Kerven plays to believers in this distillation of magical lore from cultures worldwide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRAGON MACHINE by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"This mild, gentle story is lightweight but peaks with the construction of the wonderfully offbeat dragon machine in the middle. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A pleasant fantasy with more dreamlike quirkiness than substance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAGONS by David Passes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Where funds permit, a visually attractive survey that may lead readers to accounts with more depth. (Folklore/Picture book. 7-11)"
From many traditions (Babylonian, Greek, Indian, Norse, Chinese), 11 tales plus a brief survey of eight more ``Dragons Around the World'' and a 1916 ``Dragon Poem.'' The adaptations are clear but overly truncated—though the lively details of the British ``The Lambton Worm'' and ``The Mordifor Wyvern'' hold interest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SQUIRREL WIFE by Philippa Pearce
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Atmospheric in art and writing both, Pearce's posthumous offering is equally suited to reading alone or aloud. (Picture book. 7-9)"
A folkloric tale of the deep woods, written years ago for a radio broadcast and outfitted here with elaborate, richly textured illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIN FOREST by Helen Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Libraries may be forced to discard the dust jacket, which has a big die-cut hole in the front. (Picture book. 6-8)"
In this parable from Ward (The Animals' Christmas Carol, above, etc.), an old man living in a vast, gray wasteland of "other people's garbage and bad weather" is driven by dreams to recycle it all into a forest of steel trees and tin creatures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAUCET FISH by Fay Robinson
ANIMALS
Released: June 2, 2005

"Anderson's soft, delicate Peter Sís-like illustrations serve up plenty of fishy fun and their lovely subtleties provide an interesting complement to this utterly over-the-top story of guppy love. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Parents never listen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THUMBELINA by Hans Christian Andersen
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 1991

"(Picture book. 5-10)"
A smooth, fairly complete retelling, bland in comparison to fine old translations like Keigwin's, but more accessible; in a luxurious editon with carefully structured stylized art in which the creatures are an imaginative blend of realistic, satirical, and fantastic and the dreamlike settings are intriguingly tactile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHY THE WEST WAS WILD by Wayne Swanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2004

"Readers after a truer picture would do better to decline his invitation in favor of studies closer to primary sources, such as Michael V. Uschan's Westward Expansion (2001) or Russell Freedman's Cowboys of the Wild West (1985). (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
Swanson invites readers to return to those thrilling days of yesteryear when "pioneers" hot for gold or land invaded the "untamed lands in the West," drove fierce, faceless "Natives" into submission, transformed into cowboys or badmen (or both), and proceeded to either drink and gamble their meager wages away in saloons frequented by "hurdy-girls," or to be strung up by vigilantes. Read full book review >