Search Results: "Wendy D. Walter"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 25, 2012

"Bound to satisfy young readers hungry for tales of magic, adventure and friendship."
Normal teenagers are thrust into a world of magic in this heartfelt, occasionally hair-raising story for the Harry Potter set. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1991

"Expertly translated by Vogel, with intensively researched introductions and annotations by the editors, this is a vital and captivating contribution to immigrant lore."
A monumental feat of popular archivism as the editors (Kamphoefner: History/Texas A&M; Helbich & Sommer: History/Ruhr UniversitÑt Bochum) select from over 5000 letters in the Bochum collection about 350 that are most representative of the German immigrant experience in America, ca. 1830-1930. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES MY FATHER NEVER TOLD by Walter D. Edmonds
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 13, 1995

"Simple and simply told stories, capturing the constantly shifting sands of the father-son relationship and the appeal of life before the Depression."
Reminiscences of life with father don't idealize a family tyrant's lovable eccentricities, revealing instead the pain both parent and child suffer in the struggle to be men. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

TIFFANY D. JACKSON
by Alex Heimbach

What happens when a child is charged with murder? Well, it depends. Salacious procedural episodes aside, these cases are so rare that there’s little precedent for how to proceed. When Tiffany D. Jackson came across one such story, of a 10-year-old girl in Maine charged with manslaughter for allegedly shoving pills down the throat of an infant her mother was ...


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BLOG POST

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
by Leila Roy

It took the state six long years to realize I wasn’t a threat to society before they ripped me out of baby jail and put me with Ms. Stein. From one prison to another, that’s all it was. Understand, there’s a big difference between baby jail and juvie, where the rest of the girls in the house come from. Juvie ...
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BOOK REVIEW

BOO! IT'S HALLOWEEN by Wendy Watson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 21, 1992

"A nicely understated change of pace from the more garish books for this holiday. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Continuing her holiday series (A Valentine for You, 1991), Watson uses here the same appealing characters and New England setting, cozily set forth in an assortment of cartoon-style vignettes and more expansive illustrations; but this time she takes a somewhat different tack with a text that includes less traditional material: While the straightforward narrative describes preparations and kids making their trick-or-treat rounds, the characters (pets, too) in the pictures are asking riddle-jokes that bid fair to steal the show (``What...do ghosts wear?'' ``Boo jeans!''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THANKSGIVING AT OUR HOUSE by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"A welcome addition to Watson's attractive holiday books. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A family prepares for and celebrates a traditional Thanksgiving, with relatives, old and young, coming from near and far. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANTS IN MY PANTS by Wendy Mould
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 17, 2001

"Mould's lovely line-and-wash drawing keep this contest of wills from ever having too sharp an edge. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Talk about imaginary friends—this entire bestiary is conjured to rescue Jacob from a morning of shopping with his mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RABBIT STEW by Wendy Wahman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"A book that forgoes the basics of comprehension in pursuit of purposeful misdirection. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A tale of foxes and rabbit goes for a twist ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T LICK THE DOG by Wendy Wahman
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

Eye-popping colors and exaggerated shapes with sharp edges are the defining characteristics of Wahman's distinctive illustrations for this how-to on meeting new canine friends. Read full book review >