Search Results: "Wendy Hubbert"


BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Worth staying up for."
Some fine work here, mostly new, utilizing sleeplessness as a theme or starting point and comprising, the editors note, ``a catalog of experiences and a way of understanding a massive cultural phenomenon.'' While labeling insomnia a ``cultural phenomenon'' may overstate the case, literary agent Cheney and book editor Hubbert do have a point when they claim that the malady ``is so widespread among writers that it seems almost a prerequisite.'' They cite the well-known insomnia of such figures as Mark Twain, Vladimir Nabokov, and the Brontâs, although none of them are represented in this collection of essays and stories. F. Scott Fitzgerald's ``Sleeping and Waking'' (from The Crack-Up), one of the few older pieces, is as powerful now as it was in the 1930s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOO! IT'S HALLOWEEN by Wendy Watson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 21, 1992

"A nicely understated change of pace from the more garish books for this holiday. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Continuing her holiday series (A Valentine for You, 1991), Watson uses here the same appealing characters and New England setting, cozily set forth in an assortment of cartoon-style vignettes and more expansive illustrations; but this time she takes a somewhat different tack with a text that includes less traditional material: While the straightforward narrative describes preparations and kids making their trick-or-treat rounds, the characters (pets, too) in the pictures are asking riddle-jokes that bid fair to steal the show (``What...do ghosts wear?'' ``Boo jeans!''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CAT LIKE THAT by Wendy Wahman
ANIMALS
Released: June 21, 2011

"Cat lovers will be instantly smitten, and even those who aren't as immediately enthusiastic may well be won over by this slinky, strong-minded, creature. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Striking illustrations and a pitch-perfect portrait of an unnamed pet's personality combine to showcase charming (and practical) advice on how to make friends with a feline. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLY’S CHRISTMAS EVE by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Though the story is a simple one, the amusing characters, folksy narrative voice, and attractive illustrations combine into a satisfying, if unusual, Christmas Eve tale. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The ornaments on a glowing Christmas tree have a life and adventures of their own in this tale with a cheerful, retro feeling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRAY FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1992

"A pleasure. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In the manner of Watson's other engaging holiday books (A Valentine for You, 1991), a simple narrative of a small-town family's Fourth of July celebration (``Everything is red, white, and blue, even breakfast''), interspersed with lively traditional verse (``Strawberry, blueberry, cream of tartum,/ Tell me the initials of your sweetheartum''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THANKSGIVING AT OUR HOUSE by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"A welcome addition to Watson's attractive holiday books. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A family prepares for and celebrates a traditional Thanksgiving, with relatives, old and young, coming from near and far. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T LICK THE DOG by Wendy Wahman
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

Eye-popping colors and exaggerated shapes with sharp edges are the defining characteristics of Wahman's distinctive illustrations for this how-to on meeting new canine friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUTE SWANS by Wendy Pfeffer
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Without scientific names, sizes, or other vital statistics on the swans, this is an attractive title, though mostly for browsers. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
In this entry in the Creatures in White series, glossy full- color photographs and a brief text document the life cycle of the mute swan, a European native that has been introduced into areas of the eastern US and Michigan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2012

"Absolutely no villains—even the witch who cast the spell gets to turn herself into a cat to accompany her feline companion—and a bunch of supportive parents, siblings and buddies make for a squeaky-clean read. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
A reasonably charming middle-grade version of "Beauty and the Beast" has little bite. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2007

"Although this could have used a tighter focus, tweens may actually relate to the playground politics, get caught up with the suspenseful plot and appreciate the accessibility of arithmetic, thanks to Lichtman's lucid descriptions and drawings. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Told in the first person, this debut set in an Oakland, Calif., middle school sacrifices telling details of setting and character to competing plot lines and a tricky premise involving math. Read full book review >