Search Results: "Wendy Moore"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 2009

"A rollicking good tale that effectively illustrates the level of marital entrapment endured by women of the Georgian era."
A sprightly feminist biography of a British heiress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 9, 2013

"A darkly enlightening tale—thoroughly researched, gracefully written—about Enlightenment thought, male arrogance and the magic of successful matrimony."
The award-winning author of The Knife Man (2005) returns with a true-life, truly bizarre tale set in Georgian England. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID BARCLAY MOORE
by Megan Labrise

Readers of all ages, get ready to catch a rising star. David Barclay Moore’s electric debut, The Stars Beneath Our Feet, is a middle-grade must-read as vibrant and variant as the thrumming thoroughfare where it unfolds: Harlem’s 125th Street.

“If Harlem was a human body, then 125th would be its pumping heart, throbbing all the time,” writes Moore, who ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DON’T LICK THE DOG by Wendy Wahman
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

Eye-popping colors and exaggerated shapes with sharp edges are the defining characteristics of Wahman's distinctive illustrations for this how-to on meeting new canine friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUTE SWANS by Wendy Pfeffer
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Without scientific names, sizes, or other vital statistics on the swans, this is an attractive title, though mostly for browsers. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
In this entry in the Creatures in White series, glossy full- color photographs and a brief text document the life cycle of the mute swan, a European native that has been introduced into areas of the eastern US and Michigan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OH, LITTLE JACK by Inga Moore
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1992

"These soft, warm drawings are precious, in the best sense. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A simple, predictable story about a little rabbit who's too small to help his parents or join the play of his older siblings; fortunately, the tricycle Granpa has fixed for him is just the right size, as is Granpa's lap when they share a book later that evening. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BIG DAY FOR LITTLE JACK by Inga Moore
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Only someone with a heart of stone wouldn't love the winsome Rabbit family and this charming, undidactic approach to fears of the unknown. (Fiction/Picture book. 3+)"
When the youngest of the Rabbit clan (Oh, Little Jack, 1992, etc.) is invited to his first party, the rest of the family helps him get ready. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS RIVER by Wendy Dunham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"An honest look at faith and love. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Twelve-year-old River worries that her missing parents might not know where to find her when she and her grandmother move away from their home, but it has been 10 years, and her grandmother is determined to move forward, leaving old memories and pain behind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLOCK by Wendy Delsol
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"The whole trilogy stands out for originality and great entertainment. (Paranormal adventure. 12 & up)"
The Stork trilogy ends in a whirlwind of Norse mythology as Katla tries to escape the deal she made in volume two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: March 1, 2011

"The net result is an entertaining, thought-provoking read. (Fiction. 11 & up)"
The title says it all: Losing her cell phone triggers a cascade of ever-widening techno-disasters for Elly Pickering, the book's high-functioning Aussie protagonist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MANGO-SHAPED SPACE by Wendy Mass
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2003

"This flaw (not unusual with first novels) aside, here is a quietly unusual and promising offering. (Fiction. 9-13)"
A young teen whose world is filled with colors and shapes that no one else sees copes with the universal and competing drives to be unique and to be utterly and totally normal. Read full book review >