Search Results: "Wendy Watson"


BOOK REVIEW

THANKSGIVING AT OUR HOUSE by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"A welcome addition to Watson's attractive holiday books. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A family prepares for and celebrates a traditional Thanksgiving, with relatives, old and young, coming from near and far. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLY’S CHRISTMAS EVE by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Though the story is a simple one, the amusing characters, folksy narrative voice, and attractive illustrations combine into a satisfying, if unusual, Christmas Eve tale. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The ornaments on a glowing Christmas tree have a life and adventures of their own in this tale with a cheerful, retro feeling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRAY FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1992

"A pleasure. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In the manner of Watson's other engaging holiday books (A Valentine for You, 1991), a simple narrative of a small-town family's Fourth of July celebration (``Everything is red, white, and blue, even breakfast''), interspersed with lively traditional verse (``Strawberry, blueberry, cream of tartum,/ Tell me the initials of your sweetheartum''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOO! IT'S HALLOWEEN by Wendy Watson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 21, 1992

"A nicely understated change of pace from the more garish books for this holiday. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Continuing her holiday series (A Valentine for You, 1991), Watson uses here the same appealing characters and New England setting, cozily set forth in an assortment of cartoon-style vignettes and more expansive illustrations; but this time she takes a somewhat different tack with a text that includes less traditional material: While the straightforward narrative describes preparations and kids making their trick-or-treat rounds, the characters (pets, too) in the pictures are asking riddle-jokes that bid fair to steal the show (``What...do ghosts wear?'' ``Boo jeans!''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOX WENT OUT ON A CHILLY NIGHT by Wendy Watson
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Although they tame the story somewhat, the pictures have a coarseness that gives the classic a heft you can almost bite into. (Folklore/Picture book. 3+)"
Set to the beat of a classic folk song (darn near the catchiest tune ever penned on staves), here again is the midnight run by fox seeking take-out food for the den: goose, gray goose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATHER FOX’S CHRISTMAS RHYMES by Clyde Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2003

"Like the bright flames in the foxes' hearth, this charming collection 'will toast the toes and warm the heart.' (Picture book. 3-8)"
The frisky fox family from the Watsons' beloved classic Father Fox's Pennyrhymes (1971) celebrates Christmas together in this beautifully designed tribute to an old-fashioned holiday season. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPUDS by Karen Hesse
by Karen Hesse, illustrated by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"A sweet, gentle tale. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Ma is working late shifts but there doesn't ever seem to be enough to eat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IS MY FRIEND AT HOME? by John Bierhorst
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 12, 2001

"A detailed note on sources is included. (Picture book folklore. 4+)"
This delightful and unusual collection of trickster tales was originally told in the Hopi pueblos of Arizona in the wintertime, "especially after dark when the Sun was traveling under the earth." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CATS IN KRASINSKI SQUARE by Karen Hesse
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

A young Jewish girl and her sister, "passing" as Polish in WWII Warsaw, plot to sneak food, brought by collaborating train passengers, into the ghetto. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


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