Search Results: "Wenhai Ma"


BOOK REVIEW

OLDER BROTHER, YOUNGER BROTHER by Nina Jaffe
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 1995

"It's a debate worth having, though, nicely argued here. (Picture Book. 3-8)"
A morality tale from Korea illustrates the values of loyalty, respect, and compassion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAINTED FAN by Marilyn Singer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"The Chinese-born illustrator, now a professor at Duke University, makes a fine picture-book debut with dramatically posed scenes of realistically depicted figures in impressionistic settings that effectively enhance the mood. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Set in long-ago China, a tale of a greedy lord who hopes to evade his fate and the courageous girl who brings it to pass. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SWAN'S GIFT by Brenda Seabrooke
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A somewhat precious story but the pictures keep it afloat. (Picture book. 4+)"
Seabrooke (The Bridges of Summer, 1992, etc.) gives the narrative a formal tone in this sentimental tale about the farmer, Anton, who turns to hunting to provide for his starving family and can't find anything to shoot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Concluding note; illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-11)"
In the Once Upon America series, a story set circa 1868-69. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEET ME IN VENICE by Suzanne Ma
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2015

"A genial, informative chronicle of the hopes and dreams of a Chinese immigrant."
A Chinese teenager's saga immigrating from Eastern China to Italy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLES OF ROUND by Signe Sturup
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 23, 2013

"Ostensibly aimed at very young children, the concepts and text have something a tad middle-aged about them, making this a messy miss. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Although this book deals in circularity, there is something oddly square about the concept and the language. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEIJING COMA by Ma Jian
Kirkus Star
by Ma Jian, translated by Flora Drew
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2008

"A complex, confrontational, demanding—and ultimately rewarding—work."
An unconscious protagonist is the central figure around whom a tapestry of political and personal histories is woven, in the latest from Chinese author Ma Jian (stories: Stick Out Your Tongue, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STICK OUT YOUR TONGUE by Ma Jian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 2, 2006

"Powerful, disturbing and complex."
A thinly fictionalized account of the Chinese dissident's travels in Tibet, first published in the journal People's Literature in 1987. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"Frank and funny but slim on verifiable facts."
Purportedly the memoirs of a young Korean-American woman who found the key to success in the sex business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Readers who expect a memoir to rise above itself to give testimony to an epoch will be disappointed by this visceral exhibition of personal exploits."
A sensationalist autobiographical account by a former Red Guard of his exile and victimization in Inner Mongolia during the last years of the Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIVING LOVE by Maetreyii Ma
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 20, 2016

"Kind, wise, and reflective of timeless truths, this yoga manual merits careful reading and rereading."
A spiritual guidebook explains basic tenets of yogic philosophy and how they can be integrated into everyday routines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YEAR SHE LEFT US by Kathryn Ma
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 13, 2014

"Ma is a cagey writer, withholding and misdirecting at nearly every turn, which can be frustrating. Nonetheless, this is an impassioned, unapologetic look at tough, interesting subjects."
A debut novel featuring a simple plot crammed with information—factual and emotional, conflicting and unreliable. The result is complicated, like real life. Read full book review >