Search Results: "Wilhelmina Cain"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 18, 2012

"An effective, heartwarming beginning to this series set in rural America."
A gentle, nostalgic tale of small-town love and misadventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAIN by James Byron Huggins
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 7, 1997

"Staggering, galactically gruesome comic-strip, a natural for bouncing Bruce."
Why would Bruce Willis snap this up for a million dollars? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAIN by José Saramago
Released: Oct. 4, 2011

"A pleasing, elegantly written allegory."
Why would a dedicated communist and atheist turn to the Bible as the theme for his final novel? Because the Bible is literature, and literature in a way that the best writers have long recognized—and the late Saramago (Small Memories, 2011, etc.) is one of the best. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PROJECT CAIN by Geoffrey Girard
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"Stick with Wells and Lyga; this muddle is just plain insulting. (Thriller. 14 & up)"
Weaponized serial-killer clones are on the loose, and one of their own teams up with the agent who's hunting them down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAISING CAIN by Gallatin Warfield
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 9, 1996

"A Time to Kill knockoff with more mystification than Warfield usually vouchsafes his fans, but with every trace of moral complexity neatly ironed out. (Author tour)"
Hardheaded Maryland State's Attorney Gardner Lawson (Silent Son, 1994, etc.) wades back into the ring for a third face-off against Prince of Darkness Kent King, Esq. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS HERMAN CAIN! by Herman Cain
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 2011

"A featherweight campaign autobiography that is too revealing of the candidate's limitations."
An unlikely presidential candidate introduces himself to the nation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROTHERS OF CAIN by Miriam Grace Monfredo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2001

"Its keen pace sweeps over a highly melodramatic villain—and an invitation to ponder the wisdom of risking a nation for a brother."
Shifting genres with the generations, this innovative mid-19th-century America series has spiraled from murder mysteries stalked by gender and ethnic tensions in western New York into espionage thrillers exploiting the opening gambits of the fratricidal Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAIN CONVERSION by Richard Aellen
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 27, 1993

"Too complicated, but strong characters and fresh, smart—and fashionable—action make this Aellen's best since his debut, Red Eye (1988)."
Aellen, an always trend-conscious suspense-writer (Flash Point, 1991, etc.), outdoes himself here with a cleverly au courant—and engrossing—thriller that mixes three timely suspense themes: multiple-personality disorder (cf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF CAIN by Herb Chapman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Steadily gripping and well done."
Strong debut thriller by a former member of the justice system in New York, featuring a standoff between FBI profiler John Keenan and Isaac Drum, the serial killer he captured after a rigorous manhunt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 17, 1991

"A superb study that does much to bring recent Latin American history into sharp focus while at the same time illuminating just what it is that allows societies—wherever they may be—to accept, and sometimes embrace, violence."
Rosenberg, a MacArthur ``genius''-award journalist with a strong sense of narrative, looks far beyond the usual lurid accounts of violence in Latin America to write a personalized book that digs down deeply into the continent's psyche. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARKS OF CAIN by Tom Knox
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 10, 2010

"Weak and unpersuasive."
An unattached London lawyer and company follow a strange map to a dark secret. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"Unfortunately, the few alternatives she offers are vague and touchy-feely."
Schwartz (English/Northwestern Univ.; Remembering and Repeating, not reviewed) has written a strange, discomfiting book on the Bible's legacy of violence. Read full book review >