Search Results: "William Browning Spencer"


BOOK REVIEW

ZOD WALLOP by William Browning Spencer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 17, 1995

"A work of great originality and charm from a brilliant writer of fantasy who's also a very considerable serious novelist."
An amusingly conceived and brightly written fantasy by the author of RÇsumÇ, with Monsters (not reviewed) and The Return of Count Electric (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Stories that mostly manage to be otherworldly and strange without turning into horror fiction or mere trots."
A first collection of 11 short stories, many with a Rod Serling-like twist, together with an introduction by Spencer (Maybe I'll Call Anna, 199) that laments the present-tense minimalist state of the literary short story. ``The Return of Count Electric'' is about a narrator who searches in his father's house for a death machine, thinking his father is a serial murderer; instead, he discovers that he himself is the murderer and, once he remembers, begins again his career of crime. ``The Wedding Photographer in Crisis'' concerns a Bill Murray kind of guy who forces a groom to go through with the wedding and films the bride topless. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRRATIONAL FEARS by William Browning Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"The best scene comes early, with a monstrous toilet that swallows a drunk."
An AA horror story that turns the Twelve Steps upside down—and wallows in sluggish language out of H.P. Lovecraft—by the author of, among others, Zod Wallop (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNORTHODOX DR. DRAPER AND OTHER STORIES by William Browning Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 31, 2017

"Spencer is a heck of a storyteller and has an undeniable way with words. A very readable collection of oddities from a pro, sure to please old fans and new readers alike."
Spencer (The Ocean and All Its Devices, 2005, etc.), best known for his Lovecraft-ian tales, offers an intriguing collection of nine stories and one poem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHALLENGE OF WORLD HUNGER by William Spencer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

In the ``Environmental Issues'' series, this overview of the science, technology, and politics of hunger suffers from an excess of definitions and from muddy thinking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Not just for the morbidly curious."
A lively narrative that illuminates the science of forensic anthropology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 9, 1993

"Diffuse and disappointing, as Browning overburdens his evidence with an unproven, perhaps unprovable, thesis."
A scattershot study that seeks to discern an American ``gay culture.'' By investigating such phenomena as the gay community's reactions to the AIDS epidemic, radical gay-rights organizations, changing sexual practices, and homosexuals' burgeoning economic clout, former NPR reporter Browning (coauthor, The American Way of Crime, 1980) attempts to discover whether or not a gay culture exists in today's America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIGNED, ABIAH ROSE by Diane Browning
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 25, 2010

"America. (author's note, further reading) (Picture book. 6-10)"
In a book that instantly evokes and sustains old-fashioned charm, readers meet young Abiah Rose, who lives in the Genesee River Valley sometime in the 18th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"The author has cut a smart niche for herself in garden writing: unceremonious, except when ceremony is in order."
Browning (Around the House and in the Garden, 2002) may be the editor-in-chief of House & Garden, but her half-acre patch north of New York City is anything but precious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADRIFT by Micki Browning
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Browning's debut can verge on cliché, and she seems reluctant to flesh out her supporting cast, but the main action of the story flows smoothly."
A dive gone wrong forces a normally grounded diver to open her mind to the possibility of supernatural interference. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

WILLIAM MCKEEN
by Gregory McNamee

Charles Manson had a sweet, clear voice, reminiscent of Chet Baker’s, that could carry a pop song, a jazz standard, or a show tune. He wrote some good songs, a couple of which became unironic hipster anthems decades later. He charmed his way into an elite circle of Los Angeles musicians, and he swayed a few of them to record ...


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