Search Results: "William F. Buckley Jr"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"In all, an assortment to entertain even some language lovers who find Buckley's politics less than amusing."
A whimsical miscellany that is essentially what Vaughan (Buckley's editor at Doubleday), in his introduction, calls it, a "book on language," although it does not hold itself opprobrious, reprehensible, or peccant for wandering off topic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"A disagreeing but rarely disagreeable argument with a figure far easier to debate on the page than in person."
A professed liberal's assessment of the rise, reign and enduring legacy of William F. Buckley (1925-2008), the godfather of the modern conservative movement. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RAKE by William F. Buckley Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"The entertaining machinations of the Blackford Oates series (Last Call for Blackford Oates, 2005, etc.) are missing from this lackluster effort."
From the veteran political commentator and espionage novelist, a shallow tale of the unmasking of a bigamous presidential contender. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST CALL FOR BLACKFORD OAKES by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2005

"A muted ending to a less-than-thrilling spy's career."
In his glasnost-era curtain call, Blackford Oakes comes off not so much world-weary as simply weary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GETTING IT RIGHT by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2003

"Serious, important political history narrated by Dame Barbara Cartland."
The honey-voiced prophet of the conservative revival (Spytime, 2000, etc.) runs his hands fondly and semifictionally through the mementos of the past half-century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2000

"Surely James Angleton was an interesting fellow, but you wouldn't know it from this unsuccessful attempt at a fictionalizing of his life."
Another espionage yarn from Buckley (The Redhunter, 1999, etc.), this time based not on the exploits of his series character, Blackford Oakes, but on those of real-life counterintelligence officer James Jesus Angleton. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEARER, MY GOD by William F. Buckley Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Readers looking for meaty discussions of Catholic doctrine could do a lot worse."
This eloquent spiritual "autobiography" is, disappointingly, almost entirely about people other than Buckley, and about theology rather than faith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 6, 1987

"Mid-brow melodrama that is a strong recovery after Buckley's recent Blackford Oakes blandishments—and far more gripping than his twitterings as bon vivant of the high seas."
Buckley's best Blackford Oakes thriller, written seemingly by a new William F. Buckley—abstemious, ambitious, inoffensive, hardworking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATOR by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 15, 1985

"Che himself."
Who was really behind JFK's '1962 triumph in the Cuban missile crisis? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ATLANTIC HIGH by William F. Buckley Jr.
Released: Sept. 3, 1982

"Still, for unalloyed but amused self-display, Airborne and Atlantic High may be Buckley's most memorable books."
For "the repose of the soul," Buckley again braves an air-conditioned Atlantic crossing (a sequel to the enraptured voyage of Airborne), this time with six companions aboard the luxurious 71-ft. ketch Sealestial. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCO POLO, IF YOU CAN by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 8, 1981

"But even if this is perhaps the weakest (and most objectionable) of the series, it's still fast, sly, and literate: a rare, distinctive species within the lookalike thriller herd."
In Who's On First, Buckley inserted CIA-agent hero Blackford Oakes into real history (the US/Soviet space race) with the cleverest sort of almost-plausibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STAINED GLASS by William F. Buckley Jr.
Released: April 7, 1978

"But his clean, unpadded plotting and his literate relaxation should prove a relief from the tortured efforts of the Le Carré imitators, and anyone who can make conferences between Allen Dulles and Dean Acheson sound like vaudeville routines deserves the audience he's bound to get."
Blackford Oates, the Yalie CIA smoothie who was busy bedding and Saving the Queen in 1976, returns—in a slightly less giddy but still light, terribly bright piece of tongue-in-chic 1950s intrigue. Read full book review >