Search Results: "William F. Buckley Jr."


BOOK REVIEW

A VERY PRIVATE PLOT by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 20, 1994

"Top-drawer storytelling, as Blackford scrabbles for his soul."
In the best Blackford Oakes novel yet (Tucker's Last Stand, 1991, etc.), the master of the double bind builds a plot that places the CIA chief of covert ops squarely between the Maelstrom and the Wandering Rocks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLYING HIGH by William F. Buckley Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2008

"As with anything by Buckley, it is fluent and gossipy (the scene involving Ludwig von Mises and Ayn Rand is a howler), fun to read and newsworthy."
Two conservative icons meet in a well-considered book, as they often did in life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 20, 1973

"Based on a series of lectures at Russell Sage College, this is to be condensed in the February 1974 issue of Harper's Magazine."
No doubt about it, in this age of Watergate and the tainted Executive, Bill Buckley's general "antistatist" orientation and the dream of deflating the operations of the federal government seem a lot more appealing than ia the mid-'60's when the liberal faith in the benevolent megastate was boundless. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROTHERS NO MORE by William F. Buckley Jr.
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A tony tale of crimes and punishments."
A stylish, Shavian (as in Irwin), and unabashedly commercial entertainment that allows the ever-elegant Buckley (A Very Private Plot, 1993, etc.) to poke wicked fun at, among other targets, the moral legacy of FDR. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNMAKING OF A MAYOR by William F. Buckley Jr.
NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1966

In this extended rejoinder Conservatism's most notable spokesman reviews the issues and events of New York City's 1965 Mayorality campaign in which he was such a controversial participant. Mr. Buckley re-presents his assessments of the city's problems, its political parties, the connections he sees between race, religion and politics, the actualities of the campaign itself, and, perhaps of greater interest now, how he decided to run for Mayor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1975

"MPSLUGMISTER Buckley is an arrogant, facile wit and could be considered a very amusing writer indeed if only one could be certain that no one took him seriously."
This weighty (that's poundage, not profundity) miscellanea of the comments of WFB, as Buckley signs himself, spans three years of National Review, and Washington Star syndicated columns plus the occasional piece for Esquire or Redbook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 6, 1987

"Mid-brow melodrama that is a strong recovery after Buckley's recent Blackford Oakes blandishments—and far more gripping than his twitterings as bon vivant of the high seas."
Buckley's best Blackford Oakes thriller, written seemingly by a new William F. Buckley—abstemious, ambitious, inoffensive, hardworking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2000

"Surely James Angleton was an interesting fellow, but you wouldn't know it from this unsuccessful attempt at a fictionalizing of his life."
Another espionage yarn from Buckley (The Redhunter, 1999, etc.), this time based not on the exploits of his series character, Blackford Oakes, but on those of real-life counterintelligence officer James Jesus Angleton. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCO POLO, IF YOU CAN by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 8, 1981

"But even if this is perhaps the weakest (and most objectionable) of the series, it's still fast, sly, and literate: a rare, distinctive species within the lookalike thriller herd."
In Who's On First, Buckley inserted CIA-agent hero Blackford Oakes into real history (the US/Soviet space race) with the cleverest sort of almost-plausibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1951

"Buckley is fond of sweeping generalities, refuting some by citing others; he is also susceptible to personal rather than objective vindictiveness; and while he declares himself to be dedicated to this 'cause'- his material as well as his mission may be suspect to many."
Mr. Buckley's concern in this essay (his own term) is the "net impact of Yale education" and he points out the various ways in which Yale seriously fails its undergraduates- particularly in the lack of a religious attitude and a "recognition of the merits of our economic system". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OVERDRIVE by William F. Buckley Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 12, 1983

"171: 'All this was great fun') and virtually without texture."
Again, as in Cruising Speed (1971), Buckley takes us day by day, sometimes hour by hour, through a week or so in his busy, busy life—in this case eight days from the fall of 1981. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NUREMBERG: THE RECKONING by William F. Buckley Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Literate, absorbing, and thought-provoking. Buckley at his best."
The 15th novel by the conservative intellectual godfather and gadfly is a brainy thriller cut from the same cloth as Spytime (2000): fast-moving and based on historical events only all too real. Read full book review >