Search Results: "William F. Buckley Jr."


BOOK REVIEW

UP FROM LIBERALISM by William F. Buckley Jr.
Released: June 15, 1959

The author of God and Man at Yale, co-author of McCarthy and His Enemies and one of the most articulate spokesmen for the Right, attempts here to discredit "doctrinaire Liberalism and plead the viability of enlightened conservatism". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIGH JINX by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1986

"Nonetheless: reasonably lively, relatively literate spy-diversion—especially in contrast to the lumbering idiocies of Robert Ludlum (below)."
Thus far, the adventures of CIA-agent Blackford Oakes have followed him chronologically through the Fifties and early Sixties: from Saving the Queen to See You Later Alligator, from the Space Race to the Berlin Wall to the Cuban Missile Crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1975

"MPSLUGMISTER Buckley is an arrogant, facile wit and could be considered a very amusing writer indeed if only one could be certain that no one took him seriously."
This weighty (that's poundage, not profundity) miscellanea of the comments of WFB, as Buckley signs himself, spans three years of National Review, and Washington Star syndicated columns plus the occasional piece for Esquire or Redbook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"In all, an assortment to entertain even some language lovers who find Buckley's politics less than amusing."
A whimsical miscellany that is essentially what Vaughan (Buckley's editor at Doubleday), in his introduction, calls it, a "book on language," although it does not hold itself opprobrious, reprehensible, or peccant for wandering off topic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OVERDRIVE by William F. Buckley Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 12, 1983

"171: 'All this was great fun') and virtually without texture."
Again, as in Cruising Speed (1971), Buckley takes us day by day, sometimes hour by hour, through a week or so in his busy, busy life—in this case eight days from the fall of 1981. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCO POLO, IF YOU CAN by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 8, 1981

"But even if this is perhaps the weakest (and most objectionable) of the series, it's still fast, sly, and literate: a rare, distinctive species within the lookalike thriller herd."
In Who's On First, Buckley inserted CIA-agent hero Blackford Oakes into real history (the US/Soviet space race) with the cleverest sort of almost-plausibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 6, 1987

"Mid-brow melodrama that is a strong recovery after Buckley's recent Blackford Oakes blandishments—and far more gripping than his twitterings as bon vivant of the high seas."
Buckley's best Blackford Oakes thriller, written seemingly by a new William F. Buckley—abstemious, ambitious, inoffensive, hardworking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GETTING IT RIGHT by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2003

"Serious, important political history narrated by Dame Barbara Cartland."
The honey-voiced prophet of the conservative revival (Spytime, 2000, etc.) runs his hands fondly and semifictionally through the mementos of the past half-century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1951

"Buckley is fond of sweeping generalities, refuting some by citing others; he is also susceptible to personal rather than objective vindictiveness; and while he declares himself to be dedicated to this 'cause'- his material as well as his mission may be suspect to many."
Mr. Buckley's concern in this essay (his own term) is the "net impact of Yale education" and he points out the various ways in which Yale seriously fails its undergraduates- particularly in the lack of a religious attitude and a "recognition of the merits of our economic system". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2000

"Surely James Angleton was an interesting fellow, but you wouldn't know it from this unsuccessful attempt at a fictionalizing of his life."
Another espionage yarn from Buckley (The Redhunter, 1999, etc.), this time based not on the exploits of his series character, Blackford Oakes, but on those of real-life counterintelligence officer James Jesus Angleton. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1988

"An excellent postscript suggesting 'further reading'—from Plato to Saul Bellow—appends this intelligent collection."
The prime minister of Conservatism and a government professor at Claremont McKenna College (Cal.) co-edit a greatly revised version of American Conservative Thought in the Twentieth Century (1970; out of print). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 23, 1971

"And if you enjoy watching him mapping the strategies and choosing the rhetorical weapons for his duels, Cruising Speed will provide an airy outing."
Bill Buckley, columnist, editor, lecturer, TV moderator, bon vivant spokesman of "constructive conservatism" is a busy, busy, busy gadfly among the knee-jerk liberals — as this characteristically self-important, and uncharacteristically introspective journal of one week's hobbings and nobbings will show. Read full book review >