Search Results: "William Gibson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE PERIPHERAL by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"This is quintessential Gibson: gonzo yet cool, sharp-edged, sophisticated—but ultimately, vaguely unsatisfying."
While placed firmly in the sci-fi genre of his earlier works, Gibson's latest retains the social commentary from his more recent novels (Zero History, 2010, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZERO HISTORY by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 7, 2010

"Unsettling and memorable, weird flaws and all."
Gibson's third thriller-ish novel set in the present day (Spook Country, 2007, etc.)—like its predecessors, post-modern, post-structural, almost post-speculative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST LIKE JOSH GIBSON by Angela Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Johnson never disappoints; in this one memory, family stories and baseball braid together a sweetly powerful and slyly subversive tale. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Peck's strong, evocative pastels with their vintage look are just right for Johnson's home run of a story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTERN RECOGNITION by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"A slick but surprisingly humane piece of work from the father of cyberpunk."
A return to the present makes this SF scribe more prescient than ever. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL TOMORROW'S PARTIES by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"This familiar, vigorous, vividly realized scenario is set forth in the author's unique and astonishingly textured prose—indeed, in Gibson's books the texture is the plot—but the unfathomable ending will satisfy few."
More ultra-cool cyberpunk, sort of a sequel to Virtual Light (1993) and Idoru (1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IDORU by William Gibson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Markedly more relaxed and cordial, and less aggressively high-tech, than hitherto—even the plotting's improved: highly approachable, engaging, and persuasive."
Cyberspace and virtual-reality guru Gibson's new venture is set in the same near-future as Virtual Light (1993) and has at least one of the characters in common. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIRTUAL LIGHT by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Dazzling snapshots, then—but, like cyberspace, everything disappears when you switch off."
Near-future good little-guys vs. bad redevelopers tussle—set in a California split into two states: from the cyberspace and virtual reality guru (Mona Lisa Overdrive, 1988; The Difference Engine, 1991, with Bruce Sterling, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONA LISA OVERDRIVE by William Gibson
Released: Nov. 1, 1988

"This one probably won't win over any new fans, but the many extant will be delighted."
Another brilliant, gritty, densely textured novel from the author of Neuromancer (paperback, 1984; Hugo, Nebula, P.K. Dick awards) and Count Zero (1986). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE'S GAME by William Gibson
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"For the rest, we'll have to applaud playwright Gibson's assurance that this is his 'first and last book as a critic."
What the world doesn't need: another set of jargon phrases to use in diagramming the life out of Shakespeare's plays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MASS FOR THE DEAD by William Gibson
Released: March 25, 1968

"Literary Guild selection and expected wide appeal."
Playwright (The Miracle Worker: Two For the Seesaw) William Gibson's A Mass for the Dead is primarily an offertory to his parents, a mother whom no one could touch for "brightness of heart or kitchen," a father always "alive and imperfect," remembered here not only to defy the finality of death but also to retain the continuity of their lives through his-through his children's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 27, 1960

"This for the audience away from Broadway- accustomed to getting their plays from the printed page."
Two plays- in book form — with a preface by the playwright, best known perhaps for Two for the See-Saw. Read full book review >