Search Results: "William Gibson"


BOOK REVIEW

DISTRUST THAT PARTICULAR FLAVOR by William Gibson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A provocative, surprising look at the lesser-known parts of a sci-fi superstar's writing career."
Cyberpunk's patron saint of prose proves that his reality is every bit as trippy as his fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DICK GIBSON SHOW by Stanley Elkin
Released: Feb. 19, 1970

"Like Boswell, like The Bad Man, it's a showcase presentation and something of an apocalyptic hype, more to be admired than actively enjoyed."
The Dick Gibson Show is a talk show with a very loud speaker, an obsessed, obliterating performance as the turntable turns and turns and attempts to fill the void. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PERIPHERAL by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"This is quintessential Gibson: gonzo yet cool, sharp-edged, sophisticated—but ultimately, vaguely unsatisfying."
While placed firmly in the sci-fi genre of his earlier works, Gibson's latest retains the social commentary from his more recent novels (Zero History, 2010, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZERO HISTORY by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 7, 2010

"Unsettling and memorable, weird flaws and all."
Gibson's third thriller-ish novel set in the present day (Spook Country, 2007, etc.)—like its predecessors, post-modern, post-structural, almost post-speculative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST LIKE JOSH GIBSON by Angela Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Johnson never disappoints; in this one memory, family stories and baseball braid together a sweetly powerful and slyly subversive tale. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Peck's strong, evocative pastels with their vintage look are just right for Johnson's home run of a story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPOOK COUNTRY by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Readable and mildly engaging, but not the kind of cutting-edge work we expect from Gibson."
The SF innovator follows up his mainstream success (Pattern Recognition, 2003) with another novel set in the near-present, as three separate groups chase after a mysterious freight container. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNING CHROME by William Gibson
Released: April 29, 1986

"Alluring stuff—if you happen to be on Gibson's sharply delimited wavelength."
Ten tales, 1977-85—Gibson's entire output to date—including three collaborations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SEASON IN HEAVEN by William Gibson
Released: June 1, 1974

"Uninitiates less tolerant than Gibson may find the discipline preparatory to enlightenment a new and distressing form of totalitarianism — even if everyone around the Maharishi wears a beatific smile."
A season at a remote Spanish seacoast where Gibson (The Miracle Worker; Two For the Seesaw) came to find his wandering 19-year-old son at Maharishi International University and, mirabile dictu, joined up for a course on "creative intelligence" and "cosmic consciousness" — the end reward promised to the disciples when they have put in enough hours meditating, "rounding" and memorizing the Master's cryptic utterances. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUNT ZERO by William Gibson
Released: March 26, 1986

"However, the ideas that gave Neuromancer its sparkle are, here, just about played out."
Something like a cross between Gibson's hugely successful debut, Neuromancer (paperback only), and his short story about futuristic corporate dirty tricks, "New Rose Hotel." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTERN RECOGNITION by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"A slick but surprisingly humane piece of work from the father of cyberpunk."
A return to the present makes this SF scribe more prescient than ever. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL TOMORROW'S PARTIES by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"This familiar, vigorous, vividly realized scenario is set forth in the author's unique and astonishingly textured prose—indeed, in Gibson's books the texture is the plot—but the unfathomable ending will satisfy few."
More ultra-cool cyberpunk, sort of a sequel to Virtual Light (1993) and Idoru (1996). Read full book review >