Search Results: "William Gibson"


BOOK REVIEW

MASS FOR THE DEAD by William Gibson
Released: March 25, 1968

"Literary Guild selection and expected wide appeal."
Playwright (The Miracle Worker: Two For the Seesaw) William Gibson's A Mass for the Dead is primarily an offertory to his parents, a mother whom no one could touch for "brightness of heart or kitchen," a father always "alive and imperfect," remembered here not only to defy the finality of death but also to retain the continuity of their lives through his-through his children's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IDORU by William Gibson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Markedly more relaxed and cordial, and less aggressively high-tech, than hitherto—even the plotting's improved: highly approachable, engaging, and persuasive."
Cyberspace and virtual-reality guru Gibson's new venture is set in the same near-future as Virtual Light (1993) and has at least one of the characters in common. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNING CHROME by William Gibson
Released: April 29, 1986

"Alluring stuff—if you happen to be on Gibson's sharply delimited wavelength."
Ten tales, 1977-85—Gibson's entire output to date—including three collaborations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPOOK COUNTRY by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Readable and mildly engaging, but not the kind of cutting-edge work we expect from Gibson."
The SF innovator follows up his mainstream success (Pattern Recognition, 2003) with another novel set in the near-present, as three separate groups chase after a mysterious freight container. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUNT ZERO by William Gibson
Released: March 26, 1986

"However, the ideas that gave Neuromancer its sparkle are, here, just about played out."
Something like a cross between Gibson's hugely successful debut, Neuromancer (paperback only), and his short story about futuristic corporate dirty tricks, "New Rose Hotel." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 14, 2009

"Sad, illuminating and ultimately inspiring."
Gibson (Sociology/California State Univ., Long Beach; Warrior Dreams: Paramilitary Culture in Post-Vietnam America, 1993, etc.) examines the struggle to make nature sacred once again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DISTRUST THAT PARTICULAR FLAVOR by William Gibson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A provocative, surprising look at the lesser-known parts of a sci-fi superstar's writing career."
Cyberpunk's patron saint of prose proves that his reality is every bit as trippy as his fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZERO HISTORY by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 7, 2010

"Unsettling and memorable, weird flaws and all."
Gibson's third thriller-ish novel set in the present day (Spook Country, 2007, etc.)—like its predecessors, post-modern, post-structural, almost post-speculative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PERIPHERAL by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"This is quintessential Gibson: gonzo yet cool, sharp-edged, sophisticated—but ultimately, vaguely unsatisfying."
While placed firmly in the sci-fi genre of his earlier works, Gibson's latest retains the social commentary from his more recent novels (Zero History, 2010, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE'S GAME by William Gibson
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"For the rest, we'll have to applaud playwright Gibson's assurance that this is his 'first and last book as a critic."
What the world doesn't need: another set of jargon phrases to use in diagramming the life out of Shakespeare's plays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 27, 1960

"This for the audience away from Broadway- accustomed to getting their plays from the printed page."
Two plays- in book form — with a preface by the playwright, best known perhaps for Two for the See-Saw. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTERN RECOGNITION by William Gibson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"A slick but surprisingly humane piece of work from the father of cyberpunk."
A return to the present makes this SF scribe more prescient than ever. Read full book review >