Search Results: "William H. Calvin"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2004

"As always, the author's erudition demands close attention but makes science entertaining and accessible for the layman."
How the mental life of humans has come to differ from that of the other great apes, and speculations about what lies ahead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 15, 1991

"Still, lively and literate science for the nonscientist. (Fifty-nine line drawings—not seen.)"
Neurobiologist Calvin (The Ascent of Mind, 1990; The Throwing Madonna: Essays on the Brain, 1983) tackles an unlikely subject—archaeoastronomy—and brings to it his scientific training, a lively curiosity, and the ability to describe objects and phenomena clearly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 1996

"As always, Calvin's thinking about thinking gives plenty of food for thought."
Neurophysiologist Calvin (The Ascent of Mind: Ice Age Climate and the Evolution of Intelligence, 1990, etc.) continues to explore the human mind in a lively, erudite fashion, this time drawing on evolutionary biology, ethology, linguistics, and neuroscience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1994

"High marks for being both instructive and entertaining."
A demanding but rewarding report that illuminates what neurology can now tell us about the human brain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 2000

"The premise has the potential to pull together a wide range of responses to the first battles of the Revolution, but slick, simplistic prose and one-dimensional characterizations create the flat effect of advertising copy, not the complexity and texture of history. (illustrations)"
A brisk, lightweight overview of the beginnings of the American Revolution, tracing the reactions of patriots and loyalists as news of the Battles of Lexington and Concord traveled from Boston through New York and Philadelphia to the southern states and abroad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 18, 1992

"Not a seminal work of history, but a well-told and worthwhile look at two important incidents in the history of American government. (Eight pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
In a pleasant if unremarkable history lesson, America's Chief Justice (The Supreme Court, 1987) recounts ``two episodes in American history'' that were ``of extraordinary importance to the American system of government''—the impeachment trials of, in 1805, US Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase and, in 1868, President Andrew Johnson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 5, 2000

"For the establishment line, Touchette's The Diabetes Problem Solver is better; for context and consolation, try Butterfield and Roney."
The American Diabetes Association here attempts a more realistic tone in helping with the stresses of long-term management of the disease—but doesn't even come close to addressing the anguish and uncertainty reported by recent authors with diabetes, and thus can't really help wrestle with those demons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLAGUES AND PEOPLES by William H. McNeill
Released: Sept. 10, 1976

"A brilliantly conceptualized and challenging scholarly achievement."
McNeill's global history of infectious disease and its effect on the political destinies of men is built on a stunning analogy: the "microparasitism" of viruses and bacteria—carriers of typhoid, malaria, et al.—is intimately bound up with the "macroparasitism" of human predators, be they Chinese warlords, Roman soldiers, or Spanish conquistadors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING A FORM by William H. Gass
Released: Aug. 26, 1996

These 19 essays showcase precision intellectual workmanship, displaying intricate, multifaceted models of how writing and thinking relate to life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TESTS OF TIME by William H. Gass
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 6, 2002

"Like a brainier Seinfeld, Gass can write about nothing in particular and about everything, in essays humorous and arch, complex and accessible—and always good fun."
Essays on writers, writing, and contemporary culture by a master of the form. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1998

Four virtuoso performances, playfully juggling exuberant prose with sly postmodern speculations on the nature of desire, fiction, and the soul. Read full book review >