Search Results: "William Ian Miller"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 25, 2011

"A nice combination of acerbic wit and erudition—the perfect complement to Susan Jacoby's Never Say Die (2011)."
Miller (Univ. of Michigan Law School; Eye for an Eye, 2005, etc.) makes the case that old age is indeed a bummer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MYSTERY OF COURAGE by William Ian Miller
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Well-researched and gracefully written, but ultimately both tenuous and tentative."
Michigan law professor Miller (The Anatomy of Disgust, 1997, etc.) continues his Sue Grafton-like progress through the catalogue of human attributes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EYE FOR AN EYE by William Ian Miller
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

"Absorbing discourse on a surprisingly evasive fundament."
A deep examination of the talionic code—"an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, measure for measure"—and its evolution and permutations as a foundation of the justice applied in modern societies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANATOMY OF DISGUST by William Ian Miller
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Like many books on single subjects, this is sometimes overzealous in its interpretations—disgust seems to lurk in every corner of social life—but Miller has done a tasteful and intelligent job of shedding light on the muck of our most visceral and primordial emotion."
Having ably dissected humiliation in his 1993 book of that title, Miller now sets his keen insights on something even more fundamental to the human condition: disgust. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Translating emotions over time and across cultures is Miller's major methodological challenge—and he meets it with ranging and learned references, a wry and unpretentious style, and a genuine respect for the power of those ancient, forgotten sources on which modern social exchange depends."
From Vikings to valentines, crimes to dinner invitations, Miller (Law/University of Michigan) here explores the mercurial history of the emotions, attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with honor—its defense, loss, survival, and display- -drawing on evidence from the Greek epics and Icelandic sagas to contemporary horror movies. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

QUEERIES
by Karen Schechner, Vice President of Kirkus Indie, Kirkus Reviews

Set in the early 1980s, London Skin & Bones: The Finsbury Park Stories celebrates the residents of the Finsbury Park neighborhood in northern London. Ian Young’s collection of stories reveals a generous community of all sorts—launderettes, working-class gay lads, punks, stoners, stamp collectors, scavengers, revolutionaries in exile, and criminals. Our reviewer said Young creates “an impressive and tactile sense of ...


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BOOK REVIEW

TITUBA by William Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"It is unfortunate that it accompanies a flawed text. (Picture book. 6-9)"
The intriguingly complicated story of Tituba and the Salem witch trials is presented for a young audience with some liberties taken with the facts that are actually known about her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PIANO by William Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2000

"A lovely book with an understated message. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In this gentle story set in the early 1900s, music brings a young African-American girl and an elderly white woman together. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KNEE-HIGH MAN by William Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"The illustrations have a mysterious glassy glow; the knee-high man, however, doesn't really come across as knee-high. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A traditional African-American folktale retold by the author of Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree (1994, not reviewed), about a little man who wants to become bigger, louder, and meaner than he is. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RICHARD WRIGHT AND THE LIBRARY CARD by William Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"A challenging endeavor, and an accomplished one. (Picture book. 5-9)"
An episode from the autobiography of Richard Wright is skillfully fictionalized, resulting in a suspenseful and gratifying story about the power of reading. Read full book review >