Search Results: "William L. Stull"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 16, 2001

"Still, we probably can't have too much of Carver's spare, precisely honed prose in print. One hopes a Collected Stories will appear before long."
A presumably final gathering of work left behind by the writer (1938-88) many considered the American Chekhov: a compassionate and artful chronicler of "ordinary" lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 1993

"A worthwhile history, particularly of political and military matters—but flawed somewhat by O'Neill's 1990's sensibility regarding issues of race, sex, etc., which isn't always fully sensitive to the very different mores that prevailed 50 years ago."
A judicious but generally somewhat lackluster history of ``the People's War.'' Although O'Neill (History/Rutgers; American High, 1986, etc.) derives his material entirely from secondary sources, he gives a nuanced and comprehensive account of the period—and also a somewhat revisionist one, particularly in his approval of FDR's policy toward the Soviet Union. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONSUL'S WIFE by William L. Shirer
Released: April 3, 1956

"Shirer's gifts lie more in the realm of reporting than creative writing, and the book carries none of the assured tone of the professional novelist."
A story of an uprising in a Sikh province of India, before the British withdrawal and of the part played in it by the Leightons, he the American consul, and Ilka, the consul's wife, a lovely Hungarian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1994

"EWSLUGAN Wilson's Tolstoy isn't challenged here by Shirer; it remains the best portrait of the man and the work and the marriage, the troika without any one part of which nothing seems to really move forward."
Given the Tolstoys' voluminous, unsparing, often shared, and ultimately rather deranged diaries, writing about this prizefight of a union is not much harder than simply showing up at ringside. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 23, 1984

"Shirer is still pained, still jubilant—and, on a private level, both frank and gracious."
The rise of the Third Reich achingly relived; the foreign correspondent's calling displayed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATAL ELIXIR by William L. DeAndrea
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 30, 1997

"A colorful, generously plotted slice of period Americana whose veteran author's recent death makes you wonder whether Lobo, like the figures on Keats's Grecian Urn, will spend eternity pursuing the scoundrel who crippled him."
Like Ironside, Lobo Blacke (Written in Fire, 1995) lives for the day he can nail the man—he's convinced it was wealthy rancher Lucius Jenkins—who knocked him out of the US Marshal's office and into a wheelchair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRAITOR by William L. Shirer
Released: Nov. 3, 1950

"In exposition, in description, in reporting, The Traitor vigorously gives us back bleak memories; in plot structure and characterization, it bears the marks of a partially mastered technique in the making."
This is the kind of first novel it was almost inevitable Willian Shirer would write. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 2009

"An enjoyable examination of the 'God's Eye View.'"
A poet and scholar meditates on the unique physical and metaphorical perspective offered by an aerial view of the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOLCKER by William L. Silber
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"Although not the first biography of Volcker, Silber's book is the most up-to-date and blessedly free of jargon."
From a fellow economist, an admiring biography of Paul A. Volcker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MANX MURDERS by William L. DeAndrea
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"If you're counting clues, you'll find this puzzle ingenious, fair (almost too fair—it's easier to solve than the average crossword), but also so thinly imagined, it's instantly forgettable."
It's hard to stay busy when you're a philosopher of evil whose theories are based exclusively on the face-to-face study of serial killers, so it's not surprising when Professor Niccolo Benedetti (The Werewolf Murder, 1992, etc.) intervenes in the feud between Clyde and Henry Pembroke, twin government contractors who can't agree to release specifications on a revolutionary new smokescrubber one of their employees has invented. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

END OF A BERLIN DIARY by William L. Shirer
Released: Sept. 22, 1947

"Exciting- newsworthy- important."
One of the publishing events of the year- sorry we are so late reporting it! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1962

"There's a sense of drama, an economy of words."
Excitement, suspense surrounding the biggest naval hunt of World War II, combine to make this one of the tops in this series, a book one reads with sustained excitement. Read full book review >