Search Results: "William Low"


BOOK REVIEW

OLD PENN STATION by William Low
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2007

"Young readers, New York residents or not, will be more likely to look up the next time they're downtown, and to understand that every structure has a unique story. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-9)"
In celebration of one of New York City's vanished glories, Low recreates in words and pictures the ornately decorated, girders-and-glass-ceiling wonder that was old Penn Station. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MACHINES GO TO WORK IN THE CITY by William Low
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 5, 2012

"Young readers who love these powerful machines will find endless fascination here. (Informational picture book. 3-8)"
Trains, planes, trucks and cranes and the people who make them work keep the city moving. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MACHINES GO TO WORK by William Low
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"Low knows what works for kids who like their machines big and busy. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A fun and feisty tour of big, powerful and fascinating machines; each of them is ready, willing and eager to "go to work." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAYTIME NIGHTTIME by William Low
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 13, 2014

"Calm and soothing—a nonthreatening backyard adventure. (Picture book. 2-4)"
An extremely simple text describes animals a rural child might see in the daytime and nighttime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHINATOWN by William Low
by William Low, illustrated by William Low
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

A fictionalized walking tour of New York's Chinatown at the time of the New Year celebration, conducted by a young Chinese- American boy and his grandmother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DAYS OF JESUS by Bill O'Reilly
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 1, 2014

"Insofar as the reading level of the book for adults is on a par with this effort—for the most part, only the substance has been simplified—it's hard to see the value of this iteration. (source list, recommended reading) (Biography. 12-15)"
This distillation of the best-selling Killing Jesus: A History (2013) retains the original's melodramatic tone and present-tense narration. Also its political agenda. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ME AND MOMMA AND BIG JOHN by Mara Rockliff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"An intriguing examination of the inside story of one of New York City's most important and beloved monuments. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)"
A son tells of his mother's new job cutting stone for "Big John," New York City's yet-unfinished Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLY AND MAX by Amy Littlesugar
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2006

"An author's note discusses efforts to restore artwork stolen by the Nazis to their rightful owners. (Picture book. 6-10)"
In WWII Antwerp, Christian Willy and Jewish Max become inseparable after Max's father purchases a painting in the shop owned by Willy's father, and they vow to be "friends forever." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Some will be offended, but this groundbreaking volume's artistic merit is indisputable."
A welcome opportunity for book readers to discover the pleasures of a periodical that was to the Reagan-Bush era what Evergreen Review was to the 1950s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOW TIDE by William Mayne
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 1993

"A fine readaloud for sophisticated listeners. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The ever-challenging Carnegie winner turns to New Zealand for an action-packed story that, as a colonial adventure involving new settlers and indigenous people, recalls the themes and limitations of Drift (1986): the locale and Maori are generic; but the elegantly described events, many verging on fantastical, elevate universal strivings and concerns to almost mythic stature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOST HANDS by T.A. Barron
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

"As in Barron and Low's previous collaboration, The Day the Stones Walked (2007), tightly connected visuals and text provoke curiosity and awe about a phenomenon at once mysterious and accessible. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)"
The ubiquity of the handprint in cave art around the world, and Patagonia in particular, begs unresolved questions about the image's meaning; Barron's invented back story posits that healers, warriors and others who contributed to the common good may have been thus memorialized. Read full book review >