Search Results: "William Murray"


BOOK REVIEW

MAE MURRAY by Michael G. Ankerich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 5, 2012

"Will appeal to film buffs and readers interested in the rise and burnout of long-ago Hollywood stars."
An extensively researched look at the life of silent-movie star Mae Murray (1885-1965). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIM MURRAY by Jim Murray
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"An engaging potpourri from a perceptive observer."
Selective reminiscences from a Pulitzer-winning sports columnist that, though several bricks shy of an autobiographical load, offer a host of pleasures for fans of big-time athletics and celebrities—and of fine writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An idiosyncratic tour of domestic racing likely to appeal to horseplayers as well as their civilian counterparts."
An amiable, anecdotal memoir of a professional writer's perdurable, albeit oft-unrequited, love affair with thoroughbred horses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2005

"Murray has left as his final gift a lovely book of song. (8 pp. b&w photo insert)"
A season in the lives of young singers struggling get noticed in the demanding world of opera, alluringly told by prolific writer and tenor Murray (City of the Soul, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FINE ITALIAN HAND by William Murray
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1996

"More Cook's tour than mystery, with Shifty dismayingly out of his league, but Murray's eighth (Now You See Her, Now You Don't, 1994, etc.) does save a pair of handsome surprises for the end."
Shifty Lou Anderson, forsaking his beloved Santa Anita Racetrack for the International Brotherhood of Magicians conference in Milan, finds Italy nothing if not decorative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST ITALIAN by William Murray
NON-FICTION
Released: June 17, 1991

"But despite the lack of a strong unifying shape and occasional weak spots, Murray's thoughtful, well-written essays offer unusual insight into the daily concerns of late-20th-century Italy."
A look at modern-day Italy by a New Yorker writer who spent part of his childhood in the peninsula and has been returning for extended visits ever since. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM WYLER by Gabriel Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 22, 2013

"A welcome addition to the literature of filmmaking."
Comprehensive biography of the pioneering Hollywood director, whose oeuvre included such diverse films as Wuthering Heights (1939), Mrs. Miniver (1942) and Funny Girl (1968). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM MCKINLEY by Kevin Phillips
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"An instructive, graceful look at a neglected presidency."
An engaging life of the stoical Buckeye politician, whom Phillips (Wealth and Democracy, 2002, etc.) reckons to be "an upright and effective president of the solid second rank." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 21, 1999

"A first-rate biography of a towering medical influence."
A well-told, enjoyable, enlightening—and much needed—biography of a giant of medical practice and education. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLE WILLIAM by Bill Harlow
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 18, 1999

"Though some of his characters are engaging and the Beltway stuff interesting, what should be gripping never is."
Libya plots a chemical weapons attack in this novice entry in the Tom Clancy Stakes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM STYRON by James L.W. West
Released: April 1, 1998

"A masterful achievement. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
This meticulously crafted, well-paced biography should go a long way toward burnishing Styron's reputation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 25, 1981

"Otherwise, this is more a portrait of others' need for Burroughs to be an elder Great than of the more modest (and more engaging) actuality."
After the resounding thud made by Burroughs' last novel, Cities of the Red Night, these transcriptions of table-talk serve some rehabilitative purpose, presenting a picture of an aging, conservative, serious man who, with his best work perhaps now behind him, admits himself that he may have come to sound "like some sort of great nineteenth-century crank who thought that brown sugar was the answer to everything and was practicing something he called brain breathing." Read full book review >