Search Results: "William Nicolson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ROMANTIC ECONOMIST by William Nicolson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"A not always convincing, mostly amusing glimpse at the grinding gears of the young male in pursuit of love and economic stability."
A romantically challenged Londoner offers new strategies on playing the dating game, attempting to "make sense of something he doesn't understand, using something that he does." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABDICATION by Juliet Nicolson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 22, 2012

"With promise of a sequel lurking in the conclusion, the novel is a period drama ready to be adapted by the BBC and rerun on PBS."
In historian Nicolson's (The Perfect Summer, 2005, etc.) first fiction, a Remains of the Day ambience is played out against the backdrop of George V's death and Edward VIII's ascension to the throne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 4, 2008

"Clear and compelling popular history."
Informed account of the role played by the fabulously wealthy Herbert family in the years leading up to the English Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KNIGHTS CAME RIDING by Jim Nicolson
Released: July 19, 2012

"Not a page turner but still a satisfying, descriptive presentation of locations and complex personalities."
An open, sensitive story about a robust, life-loving father and his adult son, Nicolson's third novel takes the reader on a journey of discovery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 11, 2005

"A well-reasoned transoceanic rejoinder to Joanne B. Freeman's Affairs of Honor (2001), and a pleasure for fans of Aubrey and Hornblower."
"Thank God, I have done my duty," quoth Lord Nelson moments before expiring in 1805 at the Battle of Trafalgar. In this vivid study, Nicolson (God's Secretaries, 2003) examines the weight of those words. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SISSINGHURST by Adam Nicolson
NON-FICTION
Released: May 10, 2010

"Though a tad defensive and self-congratulatory, the author emerges as a doughty steward of the land, and his family's legacy."
The grandson of poet Vita Sackville-West records the sometimes murky history of Sissinghurst, a Kent estate where the author grew up—and now lives again—and which he has endeavored to restore to its former status as a self-sustaining farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHY HOMER MATTERS by Adam Nicolson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"Nicolson's spirited exploration illuminates our own indelible past."
An archaeology of the Homeric mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2003

"Livelier and less scholarly than Alister McGrath's In the Beginning (2001): an engaging work of literary, cultural, and religious history."
British travel writer Nicolson (Sea Room, 2002, etc.) anatomizes the creation of the 1611 English-language Bible, perhaps the only work of art ever made by a committee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HOUSE FULL OF DAUGHTERS by Juliet Nicolson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Readers interested in 19th- and early-20th-century society, especially that of the upper classes, will enjoy this picture of the privileged life, 'where loyalty, respect and equality are all held in the highest regard.'"
Nicolson (Abdication, 2012, etc.) traces seven generations of women connected to the Sackville Wests. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1992

"A vivid and extensive primary source on private lives—lives whose modernity reveals convention-flouting individuality and speaks much about Britain's upper class and its attitudes and freedoms."
Nicolson's distillation of the letters between his parents- -poet/novelist Vita Sackville-West and diplomat Harold Nicolson- -further documents the extraordinary relationship he described in Portrait of a Marriage (1973; to be dramatized on PBS later this year). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 2005

"Nicolson catches grief from the captain for his disengaged ease and lack of seamanship, but his focus is on the wild margins, where land meets water and recalls so much ancient, human drama."
Nicolson (God's Secretaries, 2003, etc.), who has traveled extensively on British soil, takes to the Atlantic coast in this odyssey of island-hopping and psychic exploration. Read full book review >