Search Results: "William Rodarmor"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GATE OF DAYS by Guillaume Prévost
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"A third installment is on the way, and one can only hope the writing begins to live up to the premise. (Science fiction. 10-14)"
In The Book of Days (2007), readers met Sam Faulkner, a troubled teen who followed in his father's footsteps as a time traveler. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF TIME by Guillaume Prévost
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"A light read, with glimpses into other times and places, with the promise of better to come. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Sam Faulkner's mother is dead, his father's been missing for two weeks, he's being threatened by a bully at school and he's just turned 14. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JULIEN PARME by Florian Zeller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 10, 2008

"A sustained yelp of youthful despair, occasionally affecting, more often exasperating."
French writer Zeller makes his U.S. debut with a novel about a dark night of the soul in the life of an angry Parisian teenager. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MADMEN OF BENGHAZI by Gérard de Villiers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"A ton of coincidences and a dry, journalistic approach to fiction render this spy novel no threat to Ian Fleming's legacy."
Best-selling French novelist de Villiers, who died in 2013, wrote more than 200 books about suave Austrian spy Malko Linge; this is the first to be translated into English in decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LORD OF THE SWALLOWS by Gérard de Villiers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Even Bond might blush."
Thriller in which lustful affairs send Soviet and American agents, spies, and counterspies plotting and panting in what nearly becomes a bedroom farce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHAOS IN KABUL by Gérard de Villiers
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"As for the thrills in this ripped-from-the-headlines thriller, if you want to know whether Malko succeeds in assassinating Karzai, or whether de Villiers kills off his long-running series hero, you'll just have to read the whole story to find out."
How hard could it be to assassinate an inconvenient Afghan head of state? If you haven't seen any newspapers over the past few years, de Villiers, late (1929-2013) veteran of hundreds of spy thrillers, wants to tell you. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TARA DUNCAN AND THE SPELLBINDERS by Sophie Audouin-Mamikonian
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"High fantasy for middle-schoolers who just can't get enough of it. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
An adventurous preteen encounters inter-dimensional portals, magical powers and mysterious parentage in this overstuffed first book of a bestselling European fantasy series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CATHERINE CERTITUDE by Patrick Modiano
Released: July 1, 2001

"Not for every child, and, indeed, not for every adult. It's not exactly as if Dostoyevsky had turned to writing Mother Goose rhymes, but the darkness is there—and so is the brilliance."
A beguiling children's story—well, after a fashion, anyway—by the latest winner of the Nobel Prize in literature (Suspended Sentences, 2014, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 9, 2006

"An illuminating portrait."
Parkman Prize-winner Richardson takes a vivid look at a pioneering American intellectual. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMURAI WILLIAM by Giles Milton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 2003

"A remarkable tale that might have fallen from the inventive lips of Scheherazade. (3 maps, 47 illustrations)"
Popular historian Milton (The Riddle and the Knight, 2001, etc.) returns with another page-turner: a chronicle of the actual events underlying James Clavell's novel Shogun (1975). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"A well-crafted labor of love, MacCarthy's biography chronicles the epic works of a man who inspired both Shaw and Yeats and continues to inspire today."
Morris's life of Pre-Raphaelite/Nordic poetry, medievalist arts and crafts, and socialist politics always makes for a readably overstuffed biography, and MacCarthy (Eric Gill, 1989, etc.) addresses each area knowledgeably and stays sympathetic to her hero. Read full book review >