Search Results: "William S. Burroughs"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1993

"Early documents from the Godfather of Grunge."
The MTV generation's idea of an outlaw-writer, Burroughs finds himself a minor/grand old man of sorts—which is why, presumably, this book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 25, 1981

"Otherwise, this is more a portrait of others' need for Burroughs to be an elder Great than of the more modest (and more engaging) actuality."
After the resounding thud made by Burroughs' last novel, Cities of the Red Night, these transcriptions of table-talk serve some rehabilitative purpose, presenting a picture of an aging, conservative, serious man who, with his best work perhaps now behind him, admits himself that he may have come to sound "like some sort of great nineteenth-century crank who thought that brown sugar was the answer to everything and was practicing something he called brain breathing." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 5, 1993

"More an extended and semiliterate fan-gush than a biography; for a far more satisfying look at Burroughs's life, see Ted Morgan's Literary Outlaw (1988). (B&w photographs)"
Fawning and klutzy, with the critical and grammatical skills of the average college sophomore book report (``Just because Burroughs appropriates characters or even chunks of text from someone else's book, this does not mean they are an influence on him, though it probably does mean that he likes their work''), Miles (Allen Ginsberg, 1989) slaps Burroughs's life and spotty works down into a sandwich of no-brainer Zeitgeist-y approval (``Lauren Hutton introduced him on Saturday Night Live in December 1981 as `in my opinion the greatest living writer' ''), buying-in wholesale to Burroughs's off-the-cuff and self-resolving ``theories'' (``legal cannabis was prescribed for paranoia: cannabis is illegal, therefore users suffer from the paranoia that they will get busted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM S. AND THE GREAT ESCAPE by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2009

"Nonetheless, it works thematically and will likely prompt readers to think about the connection between William's history and his attraction to the transformative world of the theater. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
In this poignant adventure story, Jancy, William and their young siblings Trixie and Buddy decide to run away from the abusive home of their father and stepmother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOFT MACHINE by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1966

"It is impossible to describe the book further except in terms of obscenity and opprobrium."
Junk Mr. Burroughs knows and junk he writes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Perhaps not intended for the public eye and definitely in need of heavy editing, these notes may disappoint even the most fervent Burroughs fans."
This last testament by American cultural icon Burroughs (Ghost of Chance, 1995, etc.) comprises the disjointed diary entries the terminally ill author jotted down between November 14, 1996, and August 1, 1997. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY EDUCATION by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Die-hard fans will no doubt scoop this up, others need not go beyond Naked Lunch, preferably in David Cronenberg's movie version."
As Burroughs's last book of prose (The Cat Inside, 1992) demonstrated, his publishers will print anything by the octogenarian hipster, even a silly cat book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WESTERN LANDS by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1987

"Lots of great quirky ideas here; but the imagery is repellent and the delivery helter-skelter from—some may feel—the Hieronymus Bosch of fiction."
The conclusion of a trilogy incorporating Cities of the Red Night (1981) and The Place of Dead Roads (1984)—and, like its predecessors, a chaotic, sometimes nauseating, fitfully funny melange of gore, sexual perversion, and surreal science fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUEER by William S. Burroughs
Released: Nov. 1, 1985

"Certainly more than enough."
Written in 1952, Queer remained unprinted all these years, its publishers tell us, because of its "candid homosexual content, and. . .its author's own reluctance to make public the painful events it recounts." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 9, 1981

Burroughs worked over ten years on this novel, we're told; it's being touted as a companion-piece worthy of Naked Lunch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WILD BOYS by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1971

"In The Wild Boys he is weird and he is comic, but the pornography isn't at all inventive; there are abrupt successes, a few interesting failures, and a great deal of waste motion we used to call masturbatory in between."
Burroughs has always had an avidity for freaks and circuses, show biz types and Hollywood, so it is no surprise that in his latest work "the camera is the eye of a cruising vulture flying over an area of scrub, rubble and unfinished buildings on the outskirts of a Mexican city," or that a number of scenes take place in a Penny Arcade Show where the fevered teenagers are "naked except for blue steel helmets" and are being buggered left and right, or that among the perennial grotesques scrambling across North Africa or the American suburbs we should meet CIA men with tape recorders or loony generals howling about "anarchy, vice, and foul corruption," or that, finally, with the Chinese and Russians nibbling away at the edges of consciousness, the excremental vision swallows the unwary: "Quite suddenly they were silent looking at each other and with one accord seized by uncontrollable diarrhea." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOVA EXPRESS by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 23, 1964

"Ah, what a bonanza for the alka seltzer trade."