Search Results: "William S. Burroughs"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1993

"Early documents from the Godfather of Grunge."
The MTV generation's idea of an outlaw-writer, Burroughs finds himself a minor/grand old man of sorts—which is why, presumably, this book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 25, 1981

"Otherwise, this is more a portrait of others' need for Burroughs to be an elder Great than of the more modest (and more engaging) actuality."
After the resounding thud made by Burroughs' last novel, Cities of the Red Night, these transcriptions of table-talk serve some rehabilitative purpose, presenting a picture of an aging, conservative, serious man who, with his best work perhaps now behind him, admits himself that he may have come to sound "like some sort of great nineteenth-century crank who thought that brown sugar was the answer to everything and was practicing something he called brain breathing." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 5, 1993

"More an extended and semiliterate fan-gush than a biography; for a far more satisfying look at Burroughs's life, see Ted Morgan's Literary Outlaw (1988). (B&w photographs)"
Fawning and klutzy, with the critical and grammatical skills of the average college sophomore book report (``Just because Burroughs appropriates characters or even chunks of text from someone else's book, this does not mean they are an influence on him, though it probably does mean that he likes their work''), Miles (Allen Ginsberg, 1989) slaps Burroughs's life and spotty works down into a sandwich of no-brainer Zeitgeist-y approval (``Lauren Hutton introduced him on Saturday Night Live in December 1981 as `in my opinion the greatest living writer' ''), buying-in wholesale to Burroughs's off-the-cuff and self-resolving ``theories'' (``legal cannabis was prescribed for paranoia: cannabis is illegal, therefore users suffer from the paranoia that they will get busted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM S. AND THE GREAT ESCAPE by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2009

"Nonetheless, it works thematically and will likely prompt readers to think about the connection between William's history and his attraction to the transformative world of the theater. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
In this poignant adventure story, Jancy, William and their young siblings Trixie and Buddy decide to run away from the abusive home of their father and stepmother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOFT MACHINE by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1966

"It is impossible to describe the book further except in terms of obscenity and opprobrium."
Junk Mr. Burroughs knows and junk he writes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOST OF CHANCE by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Or maybe not wholly lost: At book's end is an address, with an appeal for funds to help save the lemurs."
From the strange and venerable Burroughs, a tiny slip of a book (to include 17 illustrations by the author) that becomes a cri de coeur for ecological sanity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PORT OF SAINTS by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1980

"This sweet quiet of memory can sometimes be found beneath the metallic fury and comic wrath—but the bulk and surface here remain incorrigibly repellent."
A revised version of a 1973 work, this is avant-gardist Burroughs once again with his "wild boys"—a punishingly pornographic fantasy of amoral, extraterrestrial, vengeful, homosexual youths wreaking havoc on the heterosexuality, political repression, and general awfulness of American society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PLACE OF DEAD ROADS by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 6, 2001

"In sum, then: only for the coterie."
It becomes more and more difficult to believe that Burroughs can be seriously read by anyone much over 21, by anyone but a post-adolescent with a self-congratulatory streak of perversity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INTERZONE by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1982

"In all, food for doubt that adds little to the Burroughs reputation."
Reading this collection of Burroughs' unpublished work from 1953 to 1958, "you are present at the beginning" of his career, as his editor gushes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST WORDS OF DUTCH SCHULTZ by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 6, 1975

This is Burroughs' most accessible, tightly knit work of fiction—a gruesome, hallucinatory exposition of the dying words of Prohibition mobster Dutch Schultz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXTERMINATOR! by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 22, 1973

"Burroughs is never going to write."
Another compendium of sci-fi, horror-erotica, and general culture-snuffing by America's richest ex-junkie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TICKET THAT EXPLODED by William S. Burroughs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 19, 1867

"The Ticket That Exploded, then, is another anti-utopian cry against the future of 'complete control,' the horror beyond the picture window, clownish surrealism which speaks louder than fact."
To produce an apocalyptic vision in the terms of a depraved Mack Sennett comedy, replete with vaudeville monologues on the absurd, is perhaps William Burroughs' thoroughly upsetting achievement, before which, to paraphrase Freud, any critic must lay down his arms. Read full book review >