Search Results: "William Safire"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2005

"Anyone who already values grammar, arguments about rules or the checkered glories of verbal style, however, is in for a treat."
America's most popular language maven preaches 50 zippy sermonettes on grammatical truisms so often misunderstood that even he seems to get them wrong. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 2003

"He coulda been a crank, but as he strains 'to show how language illuminates The Meaning of Life,' he pulls at mischief rather than beards, and laughs all the way to the OED."
After a quarter-century, wordmeister Safire (Spread the Word, 1999, etc.) continues to pick happily at the knots of grammar and usage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCANDALMONGER by William Safire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2000

"Richly researched and nicely paced: sure to satisfy readers with a healthy appetite for American history."
The columnist's fourth novel (Freedom, 1987, etc.) is a pleasing fictionalized history text that demonstrates how sexual scandal is as old and venerated a tradition in American politics as kissing babies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Yet again, readers will find that Safire's apparently endless capacity to be fascinated by language is highly contagious."
The ninth volume of tidbits of stylistic wit and wisdom from a man willing to display his grammar in public. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Those who believe language is a delight as well as a necessity will happily while away the hours meandering through these pages. (Illustrations, not seen)"
Safire charms yet again with his lively interest in our language. ``Norma Loquendi,'' that fickle lass whose name the author translates as ``the everyday voice of the native speaker,'' is the title character of this eighth book to come from Safire's ``On Language'' column in the New York Times Magazine (Quoth the Maven, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPREAD THE WORD by William Safire
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"In 20 years on the language beat, Safire has waged a delightful battle for correct but common English, taking on its petrifaction with such defiant phrases as: 'You'd think the Brits invented it.'"
The 11th volume of the cunning linguist's New York Times Magazine "On Language" columns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLEEPER SPY by William Safire
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Engaging and cunningly plottedwith a wealth of diverting asides on the self-importance of journalists, the duplicity of officialdom, the venality of big-time literary agents, and other of civilized society's burdens. (Author tour)"
Word maven and New York Times columnist Safire's third novel (Freedom, 1987; Full Disclosure, 1977): a transnational thriller with immensely entertaining results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 1992

"To be sent immediately in plain brown wrapping to all freedom fighters—and their foes."
The Book of Job as a guide to modern political dissent: on the face of it, a risky, if not goofy, enterprise that Safire (Language Maven Strikes Again, 1990, etc.) pulls off with wit and moral passion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM WYLER by Gabriel Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 22, 2013

"A welcome addition to the literature of filmmaking."
Comprehensive biography of the pioneering Hollywood director, whose oeuvre included such diverse films as Wuthering Heights (1939), Mrs. Miniver (1942) and Funny Girl (1968). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM MCKINLEY by Kevin Phillips
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"An instructive, graceful look at a neglected presidency."
An engaging life of the stoical Buckeye politician, whom Phillips (Wealth and Democracy, 2002, etc.) reckons to be "an upright and effective president of the solid second rank." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 21, 1999

"A first-rate biography of a towering medical influence."
A well-told, enjoyable, enlightening—and much needed—biography of a giant of medical practice and education. Read full book review >