Search Results: "William Sleator"


BOOK REVIEW

AMONG THE DOLLS by William Sleator
Released: Oct. 13, 1975

"An ingenious, teasing little twist on behavior control, with just enough psychological furnishing to materialize the spooky fascination of old dollhouses."
The antique dollhouse Vicky's parents buy for her tenth birthday—instead of the hoped-for ten-speed bike—distresses her even more when she finds herself inside it, the prisoner and intended slave of the contentious doll family whose nasty dispositions she herself has programmed in her unhappy play sessions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INTERSTELLAR PIG by William Sleator
Released: June 11, 1984

"Notwithstanding the crunch of confusing sf-puzzle cliches in this semi-tongue-in-cheek finale: steady, challenging amusement for savvy readers."
From creepy to hilarious to murkily outlandish: a freewheeling science-fiction nightmare/comedy from the inventive author of The Green Futures of Tycho (as well as several non-sf winners). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE OF STAIRS by William Sleator
Released: April 1, 1974

"But Sleater does a masterly job of differentiating and developing his five human subjects, compelling readers to share in the process of their enlightenment, and communicating his ominous conjecture."
A riveting suspense novel with an anti-behaviorist message that works, despite the lack of subtlety or originality, because it emerges only slowly from the chilling events. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARASITE PIG by William Sleator
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"The presence of a few appealing secondary characters, which Interstellar Pig lacked, gives Barney's new story freshness in its own right, and keeps it from being merely a sequel. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Barney and The Piggy are back in this long-awaited, delightfully icky sequel to Interstellar Pig (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOXES by William Sleator
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1998

"Readers will have to wait to see if there's a sequel. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Sleator (The Beasties, 1997, etc.) offers a strained mix of aliens and time travel in this tepid work of science fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELL PHONE by William Sleator
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Gross and yucky episodes, a suspense-filled plot and touches of macabre humor will appeal to both horror fans and reluctant readers. (Fiction. 13-15)"
Sleator devotes his considerable talents to a horror story this time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT THE HEADS CAME by William Sleator
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

A teenager discovers that his own memories can't be trusted, in another nightmarish tale of alien intrigue from the author of Interstellar Pig (1984) and the more recent Dangerous Wishes (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OTHERS SEE US by William Sleator
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A weak story from an author who's done much better. (Fiction. 12-14)"
The tension never quite pulls tight in this confusing chiller, perhaps because Sleator introduces too many contrivances. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SINGULARITY by William Sleator
Released: April 1, 1985

"A casual yet crafty interplay of fantasy and sibling psychology: disturbing, funny, and occasionally even touching."
More wonderful weirdness from the author of Interstellar Pig and The Green Futures of Tycho. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRANGE ATTRACTORS by William Sleator
Released: Nov. 1, 1989

"Like The Boy Who Reversed Himself (1986), the story here is less memorable than the science behind it."
Sleator incorporates the new theories about chaos and its generation into this dark, complex SF story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST UNIVERSE by William Sleator
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2005

"Although explanations of quantum events are occasionally heavy-handed, the exploits of these two teens in trouble, guided by a cat with strange abilities, will keep readers turning pages until the very end of this exploration of multiple universes. (Science fiction. 12-14)"
A summer ruined by having to cater to her brother's inexplicable illness leaves Susan friendless, bored and resentful enough to become a poster child for teen angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO COULDN’T DIE by William Sleator
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

"Good and creepy, but should be better. (Fiction. 11-15)"
When Ken loses his best friend to a plane crash, he discovers zombie horror—and first love. Read full book review >