Search Results: "William Stevenson"


BOOK REVIEW

FANNY STEVENSON by Alexandra Lapierre
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"Published in a smooth and unobtrusive translation from the French, this book is difficult to put down."
Sprawling over the boundary between biography and fiction, a tale of the passionate adventures of Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson (18411918). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOB STEVENSON by Richard Wiley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A romantic comedy with just enough of a philosophical edge."
This slight, sweet novel is haunted—in a good way—by the ghost of Robert Louis Stevenson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON by Beverly Gherman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gherman (E.B. White, 1992, etc.) tells a fine tale herself, making Stevenson and his world vivid to readers. (b&w photos, notes, bibliography, index) (Biography. 8-12)"
In this work, subtitled ``Teller of Tales,'' readers learn what an incredibly romantic life Stevenson led. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Nonetheless, Stevenson's charm is visible in every letter and essay quoted in this noteworthy biography. (16 pages b&w photos)"
In time for the centenary of Stevenson's death, this weighty biography ballasts the romantic version of his life, from his wild youth in Edinburgh to his exile in Samoa, with an integrated appreciation of Scotland's best writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"Eloquent, bittersweet, memorable reflections."
A World War II Royal Navy fighter pilot turned journalist recalls a long, full life becoming a man of the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEVENSON UNDER THE PALM TREES by Alberto Manguel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A small but rich little instant classic, as though Joseph Conrad had sent up a perfect new tale from the silence beyond the grave."
Manguel (News from a Foreign Country Came, 1990; the nonfiction A History of Reading, 1995; etc.) offers a tiny but deft and quietly moving story of Robert Louis Stevenson at his premature death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM WYLER by Gabriel Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 22, 2013

"A welcome addition to the literature of filmmaking."
Comprehensive biography of the pioneering Hollywood director, whose oeuvre included such diverse films as Wuthering Heights (1939), Mrs. Miniver (1942) and Funny Girl (1968). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM MCKINLEY by Kevin Phillips
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"An instructive, graceful look at a neglected presidency."
An engaging life of the stoical Buckeye politician, whom Phillips (Wealth and Democracy, 2002, etc.) reckons to be "an upright and effective president of the solid second rank." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 21, 1999

"A first-rate biography of a towering medical influence."
A well-told, enjoyable, enlightening—and much needed—biography of a giant of medical practice and education. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLE WILLIAM by Bill Harlow
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 18, 1999

"Though some of his characters are engaging and the Beltway stuff interesting, what should be gripping never is."
Libya plots a chemical weapons attack in this novice entry in the Tom Clancy Stakes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLIAM STYRON by James L.W. West
Released: April 1, 1998

"A masterful achievement. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
This meticulously crafted, well-paced biography should go a long way toward burnishing Styron's reputation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 25, 1981

"Otherwise, this is more a portrait of others' need for Burroughs to be an elder Great than of the more modest (and more engaging) actuality."
After the resounding thud made by Burroughs' last novel, Cities of the Red Night, these transcriptions of table-talk serve some rehabilitative purpose, presenting a picture of an aging, conservative, serious man who, with his best work perhaps now behind him, admits himself that he may have come to sound "like some sort of great nineteenth-century crank who thought that brown sugar was the answer to everything and was practicing something he called brain breathing." Read full book review >