Search Results: "William T. Stewart"


BOOK REVIEW

Dark South by William T. Stewart
Released: May 12, 2014

"Quite a collection of dark gems; readers looking for somber tales with Southern flair need look no further."
Stewart's debut is a collection of short horror stories from the Southern U.S., where ghosts, vampires and the darker side of humanity tend to reside. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMPERIAL by William T. Vollmann
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 3, 2009

"Magnificent, impressive and utterly unique. A word to anyone seeking to follow Vollmann's path, however: Get your gamma globulin shots, and write shorter."
Vollmann (Riding Toward Everywhere, 2008, etc.) has yet to meet a subject he cannot convert into a tome to rival the Manhattan phone book. So it is with this long, strange trip through California's Imperial County. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ATLAS by William T. Vollmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"One weeps somewhat reflexively for the lost souls mirrored in these fragments; more heartfelt, unfortunately, is a horror at the squandering of such a prodigious prose talent. (Author tour)"
Making a bid for the bleakest book of the year, Vollmann (Butterfly Stories, 1993, etc.) fashions a world-wide web of despair in a palindrome of 53 stories, each having to do with sorrow or loss, and often involving the hopeless lives of whores from Cambodia to Canada. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DYING GRASS by William T. Vollmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 28, 2015

"Telegraphic and episodic—so much so that it recalls the later work of Eduardo Galeano—Vollmann's saga is a note-perfect incantation. Stunning."
The indefatigable, seemingly inexhaustible Vollmann (Last Stories and Other Stories, 2014, etc.) returns with another impossibly long—and peerless—book, this one an epic study of the Nez Percé War of 1877.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST STORIES AND OTHER STORIES by William T. Vollmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 14, 2014

"Exquisite: beautifully, perfectly imagined and written. Weird, too. A little heavy for the beach, perhaps, but perfect reading for the Day of the Dead."
Vollmann (The Book of Dolores, 2013, etc.) turns his considerable intelligence and skill to a broad genre that doesn't get much respect—namely, the ghost story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATHERS AND CROWS by William T. Vollmann
Released: Aug. 4, 1992

"An immensely rewarding saga."
Idiosyncratic, inspired, and convoluted as ever, Vollmann offers the second installment in his seven-part series (Seven Dreams), moving from the Vikings and Vinland of The Ice-Shirt (1990) to the French and their impact on native populations in and around Quebec in the first half of the 17th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIRTEEN STORIES AND THIRTEEN EPITAPHS by William T. Vollmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"Energetic and witty if unfocused—but, still, this shows the prodigious talent that has been better realized in earlier work."
Boisterous as ever, Vollmann continues to revel in quixotic moments of human experience similar to those in his other tales (Fathers and Crows, etc.), yet this collection is far less successful in providing a solid basis from which his anarchic vision can flourish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 10, 2016

"A competent piece of historical detective work that is less satisfying as popular history."
An attempt to identify the true culprit behind the excessively bloody taking of a German fortress by green American forces at the tail end of World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Seeking Heaven's Gate in L.A. by William T. Anderson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 25, 2013

"Sometimes harrowing, this striking account of an African-American's life in Los Angeles delivers powerful moments."
In a debut book about growing up black in California in the 1970s, a teenager attempts to avoid violence despite racism and gang warfare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 6, 2006

"Stick with it, though, and there's much to learn about a book little studied today—but one that inarguably changed the world."
Times may be tough for evolutionists, but consider: As recently as 400 years ago, folks were being burned at the stake for thinking that Earth revolved around Sol, and not the other way around. Read full book review >