Search Results: "Wolfe Martin"


BOOK REVIEW

MOONDOG by Alice Hoffman
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"No, it doesn't exactly hang together, but Heo's art—bright colors and broad patterns—reflects the tale's mysterious tone and interspecies closeness—and many young dog owners will recognize a touch of moondog in their own pets. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Two children discover hidden sides to their dog and to a lonely neighbor in this atmospheric tale from an author more known for psychologically charged novels. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MY CHILDREN'S BOOK GHOST FILE
by Julie Danielson

Over at NPR last week, I heard a pop culture critic talk (here) about what he calls his Ghost File, or the books, television shows, and movies he didn’t review during the year. “[I]t's the great frustration,” he said, “that every year I'm haunted by all the terrific things I haven't talked about … ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

TENTACLES by James Martin
by James Martin, photographed by Art Wolfe
ANIMALS
Released: May 3, 1993

"Glossary; index. (Nonfiction. 7-12)"
Subtitled ``The Amazing World of Octopus, Squid, and Their Relatives,'' a fascinating introduction to the cephalapods, which also include the nautilus and cuttlefish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE TOY SHOP by Frances Wolfe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 14, 2008

"Wolfe's oil paintings far exceed her text, as her attractive illustrations exhibit sophisticated perspectives, appealing human characters and a dear little bunny who deserves better narration. (Picture book. 3-6)"
This overlong and too-sentimental story is set in a toy shop owned by a gentle, white-haired man named Mr. Kringle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOK! by Gillian Wolfe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"However, art selection (Picasso, Hockney, Rembrandt, van Gogh) is excellent (notable exception: Rousseau's racially inappropriate Tropical Landscape—An American Indian Struggling with an Ape), and readers will savor the striking artwork. (index, art reference) (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Gorgeous reproductions are forced to work within a detrimentally narrow concept. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OXFORD FIRST BOOK OF ART by Gillian Wolfe
Released: Nov. 29, 1999

"Large, attractive reproductions invite readers to linger over the pages. (index) (Nonfiction. 5-10)"
More than anything else, this introduction to art explains how to look at art by asking simple questions about what is shown, in order to understand what an artist is trying to communicate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VALLEY OF THE GODS by Alexandra Wolfe
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Nothing surprising but of some interest to business readers and entrepreneurs looking for ways to 'disrupt' education."
An account of the rising generation of Silicon Valleyites, who want it all—and then some. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FUTURE OF LIBERALISM by Alan Wolfe
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 5, 2009

"Highly recommended for anyone with even a passing interest in politics or history."
A contributing editor at The New Republic urges liberals to reclaim their heritage, contending that their political philosophy is superior to those found further to the left and right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"A provocative examination that suffers from a want of focus."
A wide-reaching survey regarding the moral ramifications of "the way we live now"—which, as always, seems fraught with compromise and lonely abnegations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHTSIDE THE LONG SUN by Gene Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"The clever plotting, solid characters, and intriguing backdrop work splendidly in close- up, but their larger significance remains annoyingly unexplained, indeed barely even intimated."
The first installment in another multivolume, far-future saga (like Wolfe's The Book of the New Sun tetralogy, 1980-87), set inside...well, something—a supercolossal spaceship? a ringworld? a Dyson sphere?—that has its own sun, seasons, and a land surface that curves up in the distance to form the sky; until recently, this world's numerous ruling gods communicated with humans via ``Sacred Windows'' from their remote Mainframe home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"And readers will learn somewhat more about the mysterious, intriguing backdrop—huge spaceship, gods, computers, robots, and what-all—but not enough to decide whether it all adds up."
Second in Wolfe's far-future saga (Nightside the Long Sun, p. 190) in which religious-political upheavals are shaking a city located inside a super-colossal spaceship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 2004

"Slightly marred by the author's tendency to wandering wordiness, but lovers of the genre will certainly forgive her."
A sordid case that spread sensation like wildfire across an 1830s America just beginning to flex its national brand of jurisprudence. Read full book review >