Search Results: "Yael Schy"


BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Aimed at slightly more advanced readers than Noelle Oliver's Twilight Hunt (August 2007), this also features a wider range of creatures, from fawns and a coyote to a flounder and a crab spider. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
Not only do science and poetry blend nicely in this introduction to camouflage, but even sharp-eyed viewers will have trouble picking out the single small animals perched on similarly patterned backgrounds in Kuhn's nature photographs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"For students as well as independent readers or browsers, this is a treat. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
Eleven species that hide in the wild are described in poems, photographed in their natural habitat and revealed behind gatefolds, which, when opened, also include additional information. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROOKLYN LOVE by Yael Levy
Released: Sept. 17, 2012

"A funny, deeply affecting comedy of manners and marriage."
Levy's endearing debut novel examines the high-stakes world of New York's Jewish dating scene, where marriages are "nothing personal"—they're "just business." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OVERTURE by Yael Goldstein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 16, 2007

"Despite Goldstein's clear talent, it is hard to differentiate her authorial voice from her characters' pretentious, self-congratulatory whining."
Yet another recent Harvard grad makes a splashy literary debut, with this highly refined tale of love among musical geniuses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Flat Earth Theory by Yael Egal
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 2016

"An intense story of one woman's journey of self-discovery."
In this debut novel, a Brooklyn teacher and mom must find her inner strength after an ugly divorce, despite the growing threat of terrorist attacks against the French school where she works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WE KILLED by Yael Kohen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A fresh topic explored in a unique, satisfying manner."
Marie Claire contributing editor Kohen uses Christopher Hitchens' infamous 2007 VanityFair article "Why Women Aren't Funny" as her pivot point for exploring the obstacles faced by women in the male-dominated comedy business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WE WERE THE FUTURE by Yael Neeman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"An eye-opening look at a fascinating era in Israeli history and what happens when a child is part of a sociopolitical experiment."
One woman's remembrances of youth in the kibbutz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IZZY THE WHIZ AND PASSOVER MCCLEAN by Yael Mermelstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"A humorous if silly way to introduce the concept of removing any leavened foods from the home as part of pre-holiday preparation. (author's note) (Picture book. 3-6)"
Eager to help his overworked, stressed mother during the pre-Passover spring cleaning, a little boy invents a super vacuum-type machine that does more than a clean sweep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSEBROKEN by Yael Hedaya
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

"Although there are sparks of genuine wit in 'The Happiness Game,' mostly at the expense of the parents and some of them randomly cruel, there isn't much else that's happening here."
First English-language translation for a popular Israeli columnist and journalist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDEN by Yael Hedaya
Kirkus Star
by Yael Hedaya, translated by Jessica Cohen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 26, 2010

"A graceful exploration of loneliness, 'their true covenant,' and the worm that gnaws at the heart of all things."
Call it Peyton Place with Uzis: Israeli novelist Hedaya finds the worm in an exceedingly shiny apple. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPRING FOR SOPHIE by Yael Werber
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Rural and suburban readers in northern climes will find much to recognize. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A little girl uses all her senses to detect the signs of spring. Read full book review >