Search Results: "Yan Lianke"


BOOK REVIEW

THE EXPLOSION CHRONICLES by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Overly broad but brilliant."
Yan (The Four Books, 2015, etc.) returns with renewed vigor to the job of lampooning communist orthodoxy, capitalist ambition, and "contemporary China's incomprehensible absurdity." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUR BOOKS by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"Yan cements his reputation as one of China's most important—and certainly most fearless—living writers."
A searing, allegorical view of Chinese society during some of the darkest moments of the Mao era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERVE THE PEOPLE! by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2008

"The Chinese Central Propaganda Bureau banned the book in China because it 'slanders Mao Zedong…and is overflowing with sex': You couldn't ask for a better blurb than that."
Satirical novel of love during the Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YEARS, MONTHS, DAYS by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 5, 2017

"Inspired, one imagines, by the terrible headlines of famine, climate change, and simple uncertainty; Yan draws on the conventions of folklore and science fiction alike to produce memorable literature."
Apocalyptic, eerie visions in two novellas by much-honored Chinese writer Yan (The Explosion Chronicles, 2016, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"A satirical masterpiece, very funny for all its footnotes. You can bet the authorities in Beijing are scratching their heads about it."
Sprawling, sometimes goofy, always seditious novel of modern life in the remotest corner of China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAM OF DING VILLAGE by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"A sorrowful but captivating novel about the price of progress in modern China. The book, which was censored in that country, builds to an act of violence that resonates with the impact of Greek tragedy or Shakespearean drama."
Inspired by real-life horrors, the allegorical tale of a poor village and a divided family destroyed by blood profiteering in eastern China during the early days of AIDS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCEAN DEEP by Yan Nascimbene
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"The typeface, though attractive, is a small size that makes this better for read-aloud sessions than reading alone; the story, long for a picture book, but deeply felt, is ripe for the interpretation of children. (Picture book. 7-11)"
A child's feelings of loneliness and isolation are eventually replaced with a longing for adventure in a mysterious book from Nascimbene (A Day in September, 1995, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GARLIC BALLADS by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"An affecting vindication of the human spirit under extreme duress—from a writer of tremendous power and sympathy."
An epic tale, banned in China, that tells of ordinary lives brutally destroyed by greed—official and familial. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BANQUET BUG by Geling Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2006

"A meandering moral journey conveyed through charming characters and surprising events."
Chinese-born Yan (The Lost Daughter of Happiness, 2001), now living in the U.S. and writing in English, wonderfully imagines the easy-come, easy-go life of an unemployed Beijing factory worker passing for a journalist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED SORGHUM by Mo Yan
Released: April 1, 1993

"A notable new arrival."
A powerful new voice on the brutal unrest of rural China in the late 20's and 30's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST GRADE JITTERS by Robert Quackenbush
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2010

"Nascimbene places Tintin-esque characters against gorgeous, Japanese print-inspired backgrounds in a muted palette, the delicate lines and flat perspectives providing a soothing environment to calm jitters of all kinds. (Picture book. 5-7)"
"School doesn't worry me," confides this little boy. Read full book review >