Search Results: "Yan Lianke"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"A satirical masterpiece, very funny for all its footnotes. You can bet the authorities in Beijing are scratching their heads about it."
Sprawling, sometimes goofy, always seditious novel of modern life in the remotest corner of China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EXPLOSION CHRONICLES by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Overly broad but brilliant."
Yan (The Four Books, 2015, etc.) returns with renewed vigor to the job of lampooning communist orthodoxy, capitalist ambition, and "contemporary China's incomprehensible absurdity." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAM OF DING VILLAGE by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"A sorrowful but captivating novel about the price of progress in modern China. The book, which was censored in that country, builds to an act of violence that resonates with the impact of Greek tragedy or Shakespearean drama."
Inspired by real-life horrors, the allegorical tale of a poor village and a divided family destroyed by blood profiteering in eastern China during the early days of AIDS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUR BOOKS by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"Yan cements his reputation as one of China's most important—and certainly most fearless—living writers."
A searing, allegorical view of Chinese society during some of the darkest moments of the Mao era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERVE THE PEOPLE! by Yan Lianke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2008

"The Chinese Central Propaganda Bureau banned the book in China because it 'slanders Mao Zedong…and is overflowing with sex': You couldn't ask for a better blurb than that."
Satirical novel of love during the Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCEAN DEEP by Yan Nascimbene
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"The typeface, though attractive, is a small size that makes this better for read-aloud sessions than reading alone; the story, long for a picture book, but deeply felt, is ripe for the interpretation of children. (Picture book. 7-11)"
A child's feelings of loneliness and isolation are eventually replaced with a longing for adventure in a mysterious book from Nascimbene (A Day in September, 1995, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GARLIC BALLADS by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"An affecting vindication of the human spirit under extreme duress—from a writer of tremendous power and sympathy."
An epic tale, banned in China, that tells of ordinary lives brutally destroyed by greed—official and familial. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BANQUET BUG by Geling Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2006

"A meandering moral journey conveyed through charming characters and surprising events."
Chinese-born Yan (The Lost Daughter of Happiness, 2001), now living in the U.S. and writing in English, wonderfully imagines the easy-come, easy-go life of an unemployed Beijing factory worker passing for a journalist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHIFU, YOU’LL DO ANYTHING FOR A LAUGH by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Uneven work. But when Mo Yan's imagination cuts loose, and the gloves come off, he can be a provocative and powerfully original writer."
A mixed-bag collection of frequently abrasive, imaginative stories written in the 1980s and '90s by the highly visible Chinese author (Red Sorghum, 1993; The Republic of Wine, 2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YUKI AND THE ONE THOUSAND CARRIERS by Gloria Whelan
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2008

"An excellent introduction to the art of haiku and the world of old Japan. (author's note) (Picture book. 6-10)"
Yuki's father, a provincial governor, has been summoned from Kyoto to Edo (modern-day Tokyo). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REPUBLIC OF WINE by Mo Yan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2000

"Mo Yan has heretofore looked like China's Maxim Gorky; it now seems he may also be his country's Evelyn Waugh or Groucho Marx."
You may think you're watching Twin Peaks on Chinese television halfway through this rumbustious melodramatic satire by the internationally acclaimed author (1993's Red Sorghum, the source of a prize-winning film; The Garlic Ballads, 1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HACHIKO by Pamela S. Turner
ANIMALS
Released: May 25, 2004

"An interesting two-page author's note provides additional background on Hachiko's story. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Hachiko was a real dog who lived in Tokyo from 1923 to 1935. Read full book review >