Search Results: "Yannick Murphy"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CALL by Yannick Murphy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2011

"A marvelous book: sweet and poignant without ever succumbing to easy sentiment, formally inventive and dexterous without ever seeming showy. A triumph."
As Murphy's sixth book for adults (Signed, Mata Hari, 2007, etc.) gets started, a large-animal veterinarian in rural New England faces various small uncertainties: an iffy economy, weird recurrent lights in the night sky, a marriage in which there are minor flare-ups. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE THEY COME by Yannick Murphy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 2006

"Diffuse, disjointed and ultimately tiresome."
A skewed portrait of a collapsing New York City family, told through the eyes of a pubescent girl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEA OF TREES by Yannick Murphy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 1997

"An indefatigably forward-going if often poetic story of girlhood and family amid war, terror, loss—and sometimes luck."
Murphy's (Stories in Another Language, 1987) debut novel is a vivid and often powerful, although almost as often curiously perfunctory, girl's-eye saga of a wildly endangered life in the Far East during and after WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIGNED, MATA HARI by Yannick Murphy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 14, 2007

"Vague on facts but intense, atmospheric and erotic, this is more prose poem than historical novel."
An impressionistic portrait of the famous spy—in reality an abused wife and mother with intense sexual charms. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS THE WATER by Yannick Murphy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 29, 2014

"Murphy sometimes recalls the exurban tribulations and titillations of Peter De Vries—albeit without all the puns—in a different sort of murder yarn that boasts twists in both the style and the plot."
An offbeat thriller sets a serial killer loose among young swimmers in New England and tests the reader's tolerance for textual quirks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AHWOOOOOOOO! by Yannick Murphy
ANIMALS
Released: June 12, 2006

"It is a tender, sometimes humorous journey that evokes the yearning of childhood while setting forth the virtues of the multi-generational family. (Picture book. 4-6)"
"I want to howl," says Little Wolf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLD WATER WITCH by Yannick Murphy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 10, 2010

"Initially reminiscent of Andersen's frigid Snow Queen, this Cold Water Witch melts with kindness. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The sinister Cold Water Witch tries to lure a little girl to her frozen realm in this frosty fairy tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY POLAR by Yannick Murphy
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"The simple text is replete with warmth, humor and gentle suspense; every Baby Polar—or child—will find something to appreciate here. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A storm is coming, but this baby polar bear wants to play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GODDESS OF SMALL VICTORIES by Yannick Grannec
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"An intellectually challenging, though occasionally lopsided, deconstruction of the notion of 'the great man.'"
Art and math mingle in Grannec's debut historical novel, which hinges on the life of logician Kurt Gödel. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

THERE'S NO PRESCRIPTION FOR BEING A JERK
by Mandy Curtis

 

BOOK REPORT for Side Effects May Vary by Julie Murphy

 

Cover Story: Doodle

BFF Charm: Caution and Be Mine

Swoonworthy Scale: 4

Talky Talk: She Said, He Said

Bonus Factor: Dilapidated Amusement Park

Anti-Bonus Factors: Cancer, Mean Girls

Relationship Status: Conflicted Compatriots

 

Cover Story: Doodle

Hand-lettering is so hot right now, and rightly so. This cover is ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

MELTDOWN! by Jill Murphy
by Jill Murphy, illustrated by Jill Murphy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A slice-of-life toddler story that squarely maintains focus on the toddler. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A parent-child power struggle at the grocery story provokes the titular meltdown. Read full book review >