Search Results: "Yaron Brook"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 18, 2012

"What would Howard Roark do? Maybe find a more persuasive apology for Randian money-grubbism."
"Capitalism is the system of selfishness—of rational selfishness." Ayn Rand acolytes Brook (Neoconservatism: An Obituary for an Idea, 2010) and Watkins sing the same old hymn, with a slightly different chorus, to the same old choir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BROOK by Alfred Tennyson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Hallmark Card hand. (Glossary) (Poetry/Picture book. 4- 7)"
It's unfair—and too easy—to criticize an artist for failing Tennyson, but the fact remains that ALA Notable author/illustrator Micucci (The Life and Times of the Apple, 1992, etc.) doesn't seem even to try to rise to the occasion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROOK TROUT by Nick Karas
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Angling literature, burdened as it is by overproduction, has every reason to celebrate Karas's brook trout encomium. (color and b&w photos and illustrations, not seen)"
The much maligned brook trout gets star billing in this encyclopedic, readable study of Salvelinus fontinalis from Newsday outdoor columnist Karas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"Just ease off on the cracker-barrel kibitzing."
Low-key nature observations presented with grace by naturalist, wildlife photographer, and free-lance journalist Levin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"With its emphasis on getting out and doing, this is the perfect antidote to 'Nature Deficit Disorder' and should help prepare grown-ups and kids alike for their own explorations of local waterways. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
Encouraging kids to get their hands wet—literally—this new offering from the ever-energetic Arnosky introduces them to the geology and flora and fauna of one of our landscape's more accessible ecosystems, the brook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 8, 2009

"A richly descriptive debut novel that evokes English farm life in the post-World War I period."
Lecouteur's debut novel reveals family and farm life in England during the period between the two World Wars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLACK BROOK by Tom Drury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 30, 1998

"A trip and a treat. (Author tour)"
An irresistibly droll portrayal of an All-American liar, loser, and innocent dominates this edgy, captivating second novel by the author of The End of Vandalism (1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURMUR OF THE LONELY BROOK by Debashis Dey
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A slow-moving but worthwhile exploration of common marriage in Rakcham, India."
In Dey's debut novel, an Indian woman, newly wed, learns that she will be shared in marriage with her husband's brother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PATTACONK BROOK by James Stevenson
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Slight, but sweet; fans of Stevenson's art won't be disappointed. (Picture book. 4- 8)"
Shoehorned, with uneven grace, into an insistent dactylic tetrameter that mimics a burbling brook (``A branch floating by might be jumped on and ridden./One might ride over waterfalls down to the sea''), here is the saga of Sidney—a frog, first seen recording the Pattaconk's voice in his notebook—and his friend Sherry, a snail (``I'm a listener, not a speller''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"Overall, a satisfying sequel that will engage readers with its characters and the depiction of rural England during World War II, although it may put off readers looking for a graver, serious historical novel."
A look at the trials and tribulations of family and farm life during World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"For the most part, an engagingly honest and keenly observed essay, flawed by its dribbling-away ending."
Acclaimed novelist Nova (The Universal Donor, 1997, etc.) turns his writerly eye to his other great passion, fly-fishing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1999

"This work offers only homely truths: Every person needs someone, but if you lose or never find that person, you can make a home and take care of yourself. (illustrations, not seen)"
A charming 1950s time capsule of self-reliance and community served without frills, New England'style. Read full book review >