Search Results: "Yelena Khanga"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 26, 1992

"Insightful, poignant, and rife with honest revelations. (Photographs—32 pp.—not seen.)"
The story of a black Russian's life in pre-glasnost Russia, and of her quest to discover and connect with her American and African roots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCE OF SHADOWS by Yelena Black
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Dec. 24, 2012

"Care and attention to details of the ballet cannot compensate for slipshod plotting; both balletomanes and urban-fantasy fans should look elsewhere. (Urban fantasy. 13-16)"
An overheated debut mixes high-stakes ballet education with the occult. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PANIC IN A SUITCASE by Yelena Akhtiorskaya
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 31, 2014

"Akhtiorskaya's sideways humor allows rays of genuine emotion to filter through the social and domestic satire."
Given current events, Akhtiorskaya's debut—concerning an immigrant family's ambivalent ties to America and those who choose to stay behind in Ukraine—could not be more timely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH AND ZENOBIA by Jessica  Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2017

"Eerie and dazzling—a perfect book for a dark and stormy afternoon or a favorite graveyard reading spot. (Horror. 9-13)"
Debut novelist Miller concocts a blend of Gothic horror and spine-tingling mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PERFECT FRIEND by Yelena Romanova
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 10, 2005

"The charm is in the child-like behavior of dog Archie; adults will grin at the wry twist on 'dog is man's best friend,' and kids will love Archie in his flower-print shorts and expressive, big floppy ears. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Archie the dog longs for a friend to play with, a real friend who would play ball, not like the goldfish, turtle or rabbit his parents got him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 24, 1994

"A moving love letter to a country, a people, and a woman, as well as a remarkable record of Russian private life in the midst of yet another revolution."
From British journalist and filmmaker Jo Durden-Smith (Who Killed George Jackson?, 1976), a warm and perceptive memoir of his love affair with Russia and with the woman he married, which began with a casual visit in 1988 to a country he considered ``a black hole on the edge of Europe.'' Russia under Gorbachev was changing, acquiring the trappings of a civil society, and Durden-Smith, who admits that he came ``along for the ride'' with two friends, soon found himself in love. Read full book review >